students reading in AD White

Research

Cornell historians, undergraduates, and graduates research the World. Our expertise stretches across the globe and through the centuries, illuminating the present.

In this section

Professor Lawrence Glickman photograph

Faculty Research

Professor Lawrence B. Glickman, Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor of American Studies in the department of history, has a new book, Free Enterprise (Yale University Press), that is an incisive look at the intellectual and cultural history of free enterprise and its influence on American politics.
 
Throughout the twentieth century, “free enterprise” has been a contested keyword in American politics, and the cornerstone of a conservative philosophy that seeks to limit government involvement into economic matters. Lawrence B. Glickman shows how the idea first gained traction in American discourse and was championed by opponents of the New Deal. Those politicians, believing free enterprise to be a fundamental American value, held it up as an antidote to a liberalism that they maintained would lead toward totalitarian statism. Tracing the use of the concept of free enterprise, Glickman shows how it has both constrained and transformed political dialogue. He presents a fascinating look into the complex history, and marketing, of an idea that forms the linchpin of the contemporary opposition to government regulation, taxation, and programs such as Medicare.

Photo of Ezras Archives

Undergraduate Research

Ezra's Archives is a publication put forth annually by the Cornell Historical Society. The Cornell Historical Society (CHS) is an undergraduate organization at Cornell University founded in 2010.  CHS educates and fosters appreciation for historical topics and methodology with the undergraduate student population and the community at large.   This journal, launched in the Spring of 2011, showcases stellar examples of undergraduate research in the field of history.  In 2015, Ezra's Archives was published online and articles can be read on  e-Commons.

History teaches us that, "in times like these, there have always been times like these." A liberal education and a history background make one able to analyze the whole world, going 'way back. The point of your Cornell education is that your history background will help you solve any problem.

— Richard T. 1957