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Lyrianne González

History Ph.D. Student

Lyrianne González

Educational Background

B.A. Chicana/o Studies & Psychology - California State University, Northridge, 2019

Overview

I am a mid-20th-century historian studying U.S. foreign labor relations, U.S.-Mexico relations, U.S. labor history, borderlands, immigration, migration, and child and family history.

Committee: Verónica Martínez-Matsuda, María Cristina García, Raymond B. Craib

Keywords

Mid-20th-century U.S. foreign labor relations, U.S.-Mexico relations, U.S. labor history, borderlands, immigration, migration, child and family history, Chicana/o Studies, and Latina/o Studies.

Departments/Programs

  • History
  • Latina/o Studies Program

Research

I study the racial and generational legacies of U.S. guestworker programs. I do so by examining archived federal and political records concerning the regulation of various guestworkers groups and putting them into conversation with oral histories of guestworkers and their descendants. Temporary foreign agricultural worker programs create and perpetuate racial division and generational poverty, playing a key role in the historical disenfranchisement of several groups and what Cedric J. Robinson called racial capitalism. Thus, the narratives of the descendants of former guestworkers require cognizance of their struggle to overcome a structure designed to prevent social mobility. The U.S.’ continued reliance on temporary foreign agricultural workers (H-2A Program), begs the importance of understanding the generational and racial legacies of such programs. By addressing broader issues of oppression, as well as questions of belonging, my research is situated in several fields, including 20th century U.S. labor, immigration history, and race relations.