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HIST 1123 : FWS: The Birth of Europe? Culture and Society in the Carolingian Empire
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Every year, the German city of Aachen awards the Charlemagne Prize to individuals who have promoted European unity. At a time when the value and existence of the European Union are increasingly questioned, we should perhaps look back at the medieval king from whom the prize takes its name. The legacy of Charlemagne and his dynasty, the Carolingians, has haunted us until the present day. In the present course, we will follow medieval Europe's most famous family from their rise in post-Roman Gaul to their supposed decline two centuries later. Our purpose is not simply to count kings and their famous deeds, but to unravel the social and cultural dynamics of the Carolingian period by surveying a variety of legal, historical, and religious sources.
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HIST 1180 : FWS: Viking America
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Five centuries before Columbus'​s fateful journey, Europeans in flimsy wooden ships were trekking westward across the Atlantic.​ This course examines the Norse discovery of America ca. 1000 AD, focusing on the so-called 'Vínland sagas.' We will study these sagas as medieval historians' attempts to write about their own past, contrasting their works with modern historians' takes on the same issues. We will also engage with Native American perspectives, with the contact zone between texts and material evidence, and with the afterlife of the Norse journeys in popular imagination. Students will write short essays reviewing and reassessing existing historiography, with the aim of refining our sense of the relationship between events and their textualisation, both now and in the past.
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HIST 1200 : FWS: Writing History
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How can we learn about the past? How do we tell stories about the past? How do we judge the truth of falsity of evidence? Writing History seminars introduce students to many different ways of interpreting and writing about the past, and to the wide range of sources that historians use: from diaries to tax rolls, from scraps of textile to films and advertisements. Topics and readings vary by section.
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HIST 1200 : FWS: Writing History
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
How can we learn about the past? How do we tell stories about the past? How do we judge the truth of falsity of evidence? Writing History seminars introduce students to many different ways of interpreting and writing about the past, and to the wide range of sources that historians use: from diaries to tax rolls, from scraps of textile to films and advertisements. Topics and readings vary by section.
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HIST 1321 : FWS: Post-World War II America: Crisis and Continuity
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 1400 : FWS: Rudyard Kipling's India: Literature, History, and Empire
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), most famous today as the author of children's stories, including The Jungle Book, was one of the most popular and acclaimed writers of his day. He was also a noted chronicler of the world of the British empire. In this class, we will read the short stories, poems and novels that Kipling wrote about India – including his most famous novel, Kim. Students will explore the intersections between Kipling's stories and the history of British rule in India, and also consider the broader question of how fictional works can be used to explore the history of past cultures.
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HIST 1431 : FWS: Mao, China, and the World
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Mao Zedong's famous portrait hangs over the entrance to the Forbidden City in Beijing, a fitting symbol of his dominating presence in the history of modern China. But who exactly was Mao and how has he been perceived by others? A courageous revolutionary seeking the liberation of the oppressed masses? A bloodthirsty tyrant bent on self-exaltation and personal power? A savvy politician promoting the modernization of an ancient land? In this course we will probe the figure of Mao through a variety of readings, some by Mao, but most by others, ranging from Mao's physician to former Red Guards to Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. And we will add our own perceptions to them by writing about Mao, the man and the myth.
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HIST 1445 : FWS: Twentieth-Century Brazil
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 1446 : FWS: France and its Empire
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The history of France is inseparable from that of its empire. In this seminar, we will look at various places within the French Empire (Indochina and Algeria, the Caribbean and West Africa) insofar as they came to bear on "French" history. While particular attention will be placed on the specificities of the French Republic and its civilizing mission, students will write about broader themes including race, cultural difference, migration, economic development, and political representation. In addition to engaging with how historians and theorists have addressed the complicated and mutually influential relationships between metropole and colony, students will also work with extensively with primary sources, including writings by anticolonial activists Aimé Césaire, Ho Chi Minh, and more recently Christiane Taubira.
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HIST 1540 : American Capitalism
Crosslisted as: AMST 1540, ILRLR 1845 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course studies the history of American capitalism. It helps you to answer these questions: What is capitalism? Is the U.S. more capitalist than other countries? How has capitalism shaped the history of the United States? Has it been a force for freedom, or is it a system of exploitation? What is its future? Through lectures, readings, and discussions, we'll give you the tools to win all your future arguments about capitalism, pro and con. And we won't even charge you the full market price.
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HIST 1561 : Introduction to the Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: NES 1561 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the study of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the late 13th century until the early part of 19th century. The classes will follow the main timeline of the geographical expansion of the empire with a special emphasis on the historical significance of the conquest of Istanbul, the consolidation of the borders of the empire, the establishment of the state apparatus in the classical period, a period of turbulence leading to a substantial transformation of the state in the early 19th century. Special focus will be placed on the Ottoman Empire's diverse religious communities—using the history of the Jewish community as the main case study—the evolution of the imperial and provincial governments' relationships with the various socio-cultural groups, legal and economic practices in the urban centers, the culture of the court in the early modern period, and the evolution of the inter-communal relations in the empire's urban centers.  This course is intended to provide the student with a solid foundation from which they can pursue further specialized study in the history of the Ottoman Empire, the Modern Middle East, and the Eastern Mediterranean.
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HIST 1585 : Sports and Politics in American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 1585 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between sports and politics over the course of American history since the 19th century.  Sports and politics have come together surprisingly frequently in the last two centuries and this course will take a "case study" method to examine particular episodes of politicized sports.  In the course of our investigations, we will the following questions: How do we define politics?  How have sports acted as a place for subversion and resistance? Conversely, how have sports reflected the power structure? No background knowledge is necessary.   Course materials will include memoirs, articles, and a variety of visual sources, including film and photography.   Course requirements will include a research paper.
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HIST 1595 : African American History From 1865
Crosslisted as: AMST 1595, ASRC 1595 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Focusing on political and social history, this course surveys African-American history from Emancipation to the present. The class examines the post-Reconstruction "Nadir" of black life; the mass black insurgency against structural racism before and after World War II; and the Post-Reform Age that arose in the wake of the dismantling of legal segregation. The course will familiarize students with the basic themes of African-American life and experience and equip them to grasp concepts of political economy; class formation; and the intersection of race, class and gender.
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HIST 1622 : The World of Modern Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2222, CAPS 1622, GOVT 1623 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In 1868, samurai revolutionaries and their allies seized the reins of power and established a new capital they called Tokyo.  Against all odds, this fragile regime survived and made Tokyo a center of power that would transform both Japan and the world.  This survey of Japanese history explores the rise and fall of Japan as a modern imperial power; its foreign relations; its economic and scientific development from "feudalism" to futuristic technologies; and Japan's many modern revolutions, from the rule of the samurai to Westernization and democracy, from democratic collapse to fascism and World War II, and from Japan's postwar rebirth to the present.  We will examine not only big events but also everyday life, including gender and sexuality, family and schools, and art and popular culture.
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HIST 1640 : U.S. History since the Great Depression
Crosslisted as: AMST 1640 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
An introductory survey to United States history since the Great Depression, this course explores the dramatic social, economic, and political transformations of the last century. It emphasizes domestic political developments, particularly the evolving notions of government responsibility for various social problems. Therefore, the course is especially concerned with the interactions between the state, popular movements, and people's daily lives.
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HIST 1650 : Myths of Monarchy in Europe, Medieval Times to the Present
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Despite the presence of women and lunatics on the throne, monarchy was for centuries considered the best form of government. Even today we are fascinated by Diana, Will and Kate. Why? Using drama, visual arts, political treaties and court ritual we will examine how monarchy was legitimated, where power really lay, how gender and sexuality affected politics and how monarchy in modern times has intersected with popular culture and with modern ideologies like nationalism.
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HIST 1700 : History of Exploration: Land, Sea, and Space
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 1700 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
From ancient seafarers to the Mars rovers, from Christopher Columbus to the Apollo astronauts, humans have for centuries explored the far reaches of our planet and are now venturing into the solar system and beyond. This course examines the history of such human activity. Among the topics covered are motives for exploration, technological advances that assist exploration, obstacles that must be overcome, the roles of leaders, the spread of information about exploration, and positive and negative consequences of exploration. It is led by Steven Squyres of Astronomy and Mary Beth Norton of History, with the assistance of guest lecturers.
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HIST 1740 : Imperial China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1174, CAPS 1740, MEDVL 1740 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the history of imperial China between the 3rd century b.c.e. and the 16th century c.e. with a focus on the following questions:  How did imperial Chinese states go about politically unifying diverse peoples over vast spaces?  How did imperial Chinese approaches to governance and to relations with the outer world compare with strategies employed by other historical empires?  How did those approaches change over time?  How did major socio-cultural formations — including literary canons; religious and familial lineages; marketing networks; and popular book and theatrical cultures — grow and take root, and what were the broader ramifications of those developments?  How did such basic configurations of human difference as Chinese (civilized)-barbarian identity, high-low status, and male-female gender operate and change over time?
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HIST 1802 : Introduction to Latinos in U.S. History
Crosslisted as: AMST 1802, LATA 1802, LSP 1802 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course seeks a fuller recounting of U.S. history by remapping what we understand as "America." We will examine traditional themes in the teaching of U.S. history—territorial expansion and empire, migration and nation building, industrialization and labor, war and revolution, and citizenship and transnationalism—but we will examine this "American experience" in a broader hemispheric context and include as actors americanos of Spanish, Mexican, Caribbean, and Central/South American ancestries.
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HIST 1886 : Introduction to Food Studies: History and Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 1886 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the growing field of academic Food Studies, providing historical perspective into the development of American culinary culture. Discussions of American cuisine will lead directly into larger concepts of American identity: is there a uniquely American menu? How have restaurants shaped American patterns of sociability and civil rights? What are the 19th century origins of tipping? Students will actively engage with 19th and early 20th century primary source material, including recipes, advertisements, cookbooks, and nutrition manuals.
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HIST 1910 : Introduction to Modern Asian History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1191, CAPS 1910 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course follows the history of Asia-Pacific from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on the relations of China, India, Japan, South, and Southeast Asia.  This course is intended for students wanting a broad historical overview of what makes Asia distinctive and important in the global economy and in world politics.
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HIST 1920 : Modern China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1192, CAPS 1920 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course surveys modern Chinese history from 1644 to 1949. Time will be devoted to each of the three major periods: China's last empire, the Great Qing (1644-1911); the early Republic (1912-1927); and the Nationalist period (1928-1949). It guides students through pivotal events in modern Chinese history, and uncovers the origins and trajectory of China's painful transition from a powerful early modern empire to a country torn by civil unrest and imperialist invasion, and then from a newly-recognized "Great Power" in the post-World War II international order to a vanguard of the global communist revolution.
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HIST 1930 : A Global History of Love
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1193, FGSS 1940, LGBT 1940 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
By posing seemingly simple questions such as what is love and who has the right to love, this introductory-level lecture course surveys how love has been experienced and expressed from the pre-modern period to the present. Through case studies of familial and conjugal love in Africa, Asia, the US, Europe, and South and Latin America, the course will examine the debates about and enactment's of what constitutes the appropriate way to show love and affection in different cultures and historical contexts. Among the themes we will explore are questions of sexuality, marriage, kinship, and gender rights. A final unit will examine these themes through modern technologies such as the Internet, scientific advances in medicine, and a growing awareness that who and how we love is anything but simple or universal.
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HIST 1941 : The History of Science in Europe: From the Ancient Legacy to Isaac Newton
Crosslisted as: BSOC 1941, STS 1941 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How did the approaches to knowledge of nature that developed in medieval and early-modern Europe create an enterprise that associated the practical manipulation of nature with scientific truth? This course surveys intellectual approaches to the natural world from the theologically-shaped institutions of the Middle Ages to the Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries. Ancient Greek authors such as Aristotle and Archimedes were used in diverse ways that came to usher in an era of European global expansion. By the late 17th century, a new kind of practically applicable science attempted to demonstrate Francis Bacon's famous claim that "knowledge is power." 
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HIST 1950 : The Invention of the Americas
Crosslisted as: LATA 1950 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
When did the 'Americas' come in to being?  Who created 'them' and how? What other geographic units of analysis might we consider in thinking about what Iberian explorers and intellectuals initially called the 'fourth part' of the world?  Given the scope and extent of the Spanish and Portuguese empires, could 'the Americas' extend from the Caribbean to the Philippines?  This course takes up such questions as a means to explore the history of what would become-only in the nineteenth century-'Latin America.' We move from the initial "encounters" of peoples from Africa and Iberia with the "New World," the creation of long-distance trade with, and settlement in, Asia, and the establishment of colonial societies, through to the movements for independence in most of mainland Spanish America in the early 19th century and to the collapse of Spanish rule in the Pacific and Caribbean later that century. Through lectures, discussions and the reading of primary sources and secondary texts, the course examines the economic and social organization of the colonies, intellectual currents and colonial science, native accommodation and resistance to colonial rule, trade networks and imperial expansion, labor regimes and forms of economic production, and migration and movement.
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HIST 1960 : Modern Latin America
Crosslisted as: LATA 1960 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
A survey of the social, political, cultural and economic history of Latin America from roughly 1800 to the present. Primary aim is to develop a mental map of the history of Latin America - of prominent themes issues; of historical eras and trajectories. Given the vastness of Latin America, and its somewhat arbitrary composition as an object of study, the approach of the course is thematic and chronological rather than regional. We will pay attention to a number of more specific and interconnected themes: the development of, and relationship between, economies and processes of state formation; the complex roles Britain and the U.S. have played in the region, but always with an appreciation for how Latin Americans have shaped their own histories and those of the U.S. and Britain; the ways in which non-elites - slaves, workers, peasants, among others - have shaped history; the politics of the production of history; and Latin America's 'situatedness' in a broader world. Weekly readings include historical and theoretical works memoirs, speeches, documents and novels. 
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HIST 2001 : Supervised Reading - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised reading with history faculty.  Student must complete Independent Study Form with faculty supervisor for determining requirements and for permission to enroll through the online system (https://data.arts/cornell.edu/as-stus/indep_study_intro.cfm).  Student then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 2001 : Supervised Reading - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised reading with history faculty.  Student must complete Independent Study Form with faculty supervisor for determining requirements and for permission to enroll through the online system (https://data.arts/cornell.edu/as-stus/indep_study_intro.cfm).  Student then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 2005 : The First American University
Crosslisted as: AMST 2001, ENGL 2999 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Educational historian Frederick Rudolph called Cornell University "the first American university," referring to its unique role as a coeducational, nonsectarian, land-grant institution with a broad curriculum and diverse student body. In this course, we will explore the history of Cornell, taking as our focus the pledge of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White to found a university where "any person can find instruction in any study." The course will cover a wide range of topics and perspectives relating to the faculty, student body, evolution of campus, and important events and eras in Cornell history. Stories and vignettes will provide background on the current university and its administrative structure, campus traditions, and the names that adorn buildings and memorials throughout campus. Finally, the course will offer a forum for students to address questions on present-day aspects of the university.
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HIST 2042 : Jim Crow and Exclusion Era in America
Crosslisted as: AAS 2042, AMST 2042 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines America during the overlapping eras of segregation & immigration exclusion.  Beginning with contests over the weaning of freedom during reconstruction and running through the institution of Jim Crow legislation and immigration exclusion, the course ends with an evaluation of mid-20th century movements for civil rights and equality.  Themes include the links between racial and economic oppression, legal and defacto restriction, everyday resistance, and struggles for equality.
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HIST 2096 : Intellectual History in Black and White
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What are intellectuals and why should we care about them? And how are they, like everyone else, inscribed in racial and social hierarchies that condition both their position in a broader social world and the very content of their interventions? In exploring these questions, this course will take a capacious approach that includes women, colonial subjects, and less formally-trained "organic" intellectuals, in addition to understanding the specific French origins of the term. Together we will work with thinkers such as Sigmund Freud, Rosa Luxemburg, Walter Rodney, Frantz Fanon, and lesser known Brazilian authors. We will discuss psychoanalysis, Marxism, anticolonial politics, and racial inclusion, constantly drawing texts and social contexts into dialogue. Ultimately students' final research papers will address a given intellectual, work, movement, or concept.
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HIST 2105 : Crime and Punishment in Medieval Europe
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
All past and present societies confront the fundamental problem of what should be done with those who violate society's rules and customs and why they should be punished. Despite its modern reputation for illogical violence and brutality, medieval Europe is no exception to this principle. Medieval societies held ideas about punishment and redress for offense and injury which while very different were no less complex than our own.
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HIST 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: AMST 2112, ASRC 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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HIST 2132 : Law and Society in Early Modern and Modern China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2280, CAPS 2132 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
China was and still is regarded in the Western world as a country without the rule of law. In this course, students examine recent scholarship that challenges this simplified understanding of the role of law in Chinese politics and society. It approaches law in early modern and modern China both as a state institution of governance and control, and as a platform that facilitates interactions and negotiations between state and society, between different social forces, and between different cultures. At the same time, this course guides students to develop projects of their own choice, either addressing legal issues or using legal sources, from tentative proposals to research papers based on their examination of original or translated primary sources.
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HIST 2146 : Health and Fitness Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 2146 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Health and fitness are key concepts that define "good" bodies and "good" citizens.  The course examines the history of the changing definitions of health and fitness, asking questions such as: How has the discovery of the vitamin and the introduction of the calorie changed ideas of proper diet? What is the historical origin of anorexia? What is the "halitosis appeal" in 20th century advertising? How have spas and hot springs shaped the American rural landscape?
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HIST 2155 : The Invention of Religion
Crosslisted as: JWST 2155, RELST 2155 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Religion is a term with a rich history but without a precise definition. Everyone can describe a religious idea or a religious experience even though there is no agreement about what it is that makes an idea or an experience religious. How did this state of things come about? What is it that makes religion both one thing and many things? Why do we apply this concept to Christianity, Islam and Judaism and to the deep feelings we associate with secular forms of devotion and enthusiasm — for food, for love, for family, for art, for sport? In this seminar, we will discover that religion is a distinctly modern concept, developed to address the psychological and social needs of Europeans increasingly adrift from the traditional communal practices and moral commitments of their parents and grandparents. Tracing the history of "religion" — rather than the history of religions — from the age of Immanuel Kant to the age of Emmanuel Levinas, we will examine paradoxical connection between the rise of religion and the decline of faith.
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HIST 2156 : Anti-Semitism and the Making of European Jewry
Crosslisted as: JWST 2156, RELST 2156 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Does hatred have a history? Historians insist that Europe invented a tradition of hating Jews and Judaism; some go so far as to argue that the destruction of European Jewry during the Holocaust was the culmination of a thousand-year-old prejudice against Jewish difference, cultivated not only by cranks and lunatics at the margins of European discourse, but by great luminaries with a reputation for progressive, even radical, opinions. In fact, the cultural problem of Jewish difference was implicated in both the destruction and the creation of European Jewry. In this seminar, we will examine exemplary works of Europe's famous anti-Jewish canon — such as Paul's letter to the Romans, Luther's "On the Jews and their Lies," and Marx's "On the Jewish Question" — in order to contextualize a mythology of Jewish "otherness" that enflamed the anti-Jewish imagination even when there were few Jewish "others" around to hate. We will also look at critical moments in Jewish history marked by the appropriation of anti-Jewish arguments in the name of Jewish social discipline and moral authority. Through the prism of provocative Jewish texts such as the Crusade chronicles, Mendelssohn's Jerusalem and Pinsker's "Auto-emancipation" we will explore some of the ways in which the "enabling violation" of anti-semitism both constrained Jewish existence and liberated Jewish self-consciousness, turning Europe into a home for Judaism as well as a Jewish "hell on earth."
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HIST 2163 : History of the United Nations
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A general history of the United Nations from its origins to the present. The course will deal with changes  in the missions and operations of all the major departments of the UN and its associated organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, but the emphasis will be on the crisis activities of the Security Council and peacekeeping activities in the field. 
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HIST 2209 : Daoist Traditions
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2289, CAPS 2209, RELST 2209 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will examine the modes of philosophical and spiritual inquiry, varieties of spiritual/bodily cultivation and practice, and religious organizations and movements in China that we know as Daoist (or "Taoist"). We will examine the ways in which Daoism was used variously to contest or legitimate imperial political power, and how the procedures and ideologies of the imperial state in turn informed Daoist theory and practice.  Throughout, we will examine the ways in which standard modern western dichotomies, such as sacred/secular, spiritual/physical, and mind/body, break down when we try to apply them to the study of Daoism.  Course will focus on the period from the fourth century B.C.E. to the thirteenth century C.E. 
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HIST 2220 : From the New Deal to the Age of Reagan
Crosslisted as: AMST 2220 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will explore some of the major political and cultural trends in the United States,  from the era of the Democratic New Dealer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, through the era of the conservative Republican, Ronald Reagan? This seminar will explore through primary source research and secondary readings  the key economic, political, and cultural characteristics and transformations of the period from 1930 though the turn of the century.  The course will examine the rise, persistence, and breakdown of the so-called "New Deal Order" and the crucial political shifts that we call the "Reagan Revolution." A key theme in this course will be the transformations and critiques of American liberalism and conservatism.
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HIST 2251 : U.S. Immigration Narratives
Crosslisted as: AMST 2251, LSP 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Americans are conflicted about immigration. We honor and celebrate (and commercialize) our immigrant heritage in museums, folklife festivals, parades, pageants, and historical monuments. We also build fences and detention centers, and pass more and more laws to bar access to the United States. Polls tell us that Americans are concerned about the capacity of the United States to absorb so many immigrants from around the world. How often have we heard the laments "Today's immigrants are too different. They don't want to assimilate" or "My grandparents learned English quickly, why can't they?" The assumption is that older generations 'Americanized' quickly but that today's immigrants do not want to assimilate. Did 19th century immigrants really migrate to the United States to "become Americans"? Did they really assimilate quickly? Are today's immigrants really all that different from the immigrants who arrived earlier? Why do these particular narratives have such power and currency? This seminar will explore these issues and help students discern fact from fiction. 
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HIST 2274 : The Manson Murders
Crosslisted as: AMST 2274 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
On August 9-10, 1969, ex-convict, aspiring rock star, and charismatic leader Charles Manson ordered his so-called Family to brutally murder a few of LA's rich, white, "beautiful people" and leave clues implicating black radicals. The idea was to trigger an apocalyptic race war he called "Helter Skelter" (after a song by The Beatles). Today, these murders stand as the most infamous in twentieth-century U.S. criminal history and as synecdoche for the "end of the Sixties." They have also spawned a veritable Manson Industry in the popular realm: there are now Manson books, movies, TV shows, documentaries, podcasts, websites, music, comics, t-shirts, and even a tourist attraction (the Hollywood "Helter Skelter" tour).  The seminar will analyze the history of the Manson murders as well as their incredible resonance in American culture over the past half century. Who was Charles Manson and who were the members of the Family? What was the Family's relation to the counterculture, to Hollywood, Vietnam, the Black Panther Party, and environmentalism? How might we fit the Manson murders into the long history of apocalyptic violence and terror? And what does it mean that the Manson murders have occupied our collective imagination for fifty years? To answer these and other questions, we will analyze a variety of sources including television and newspaper reports, trial transcripts, true crime writing, memoirs, interviews, novels, films and documentaries, podcasts and pop songs.
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HIST 2354 : African American Visions of Africa
Crosslisted as: AMST 2354, ASRC 2354 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines some of the political and cultural visions of Africa and Africans held by African-American intellectuals and activists in the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is placed on the philosophies of black nationalism, Pan Africanism and anticolonialism and the themes of emigration, expatriation, repatriation and exile. Awareness of Africa and attitudes toward the continent and its peoples have profoundly shaped African-American identity, culture and political consciousness. Notions of a linked fate between Africans and black Americans have long influenced black life and liberation struggles within the U.S. The motives, purposes and outlooks of African-American theorists who have claimed political, cultural, or spiritual connection to Africa and Africans have varied widely, though they have always powerfully reflected black experiences in America and in the West. The complexity and dynamism of those views belie simplistic assumptions about essential or "natural" relationships, and invite critical contemplation of the myriad roles that Africa has played in the African-American mind."
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HIST 2391 : From Terra Incognita to Territories of Nation-States: Early American History in Two Dozen Maps
Crosslisted as: AMST 2391 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course engages the rich cartographic record of colonial North America via an in-depth analysis of two dozen iconic maps.  Integrating visual and textual analysis, students will assess human representations of space across cultural boundaries, explore change over time in the mapmaking practices of indigenous peoples and various European intruders, and study the evolving relationship between cartography and power, attending particularly to the process by which mapping promoted a revolutionary new understanding of American geography as composed of the bounded territories of nation-states.
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HIST 2423 : Dazed and Confused: The Politics of Drug and Alcohol in US History
Crosslisted as: AMST 2423 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
How did some intoxicating substances come to be illegal, while others are socially accepted? What is the role and responsibility of the state in managing the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol? This seminar examines the history of the nation's efforts to control and regulate intoxicants, with special attention given to why specific substances are criminalized and decriminalized at various points in history. It will focus on the relationship between social, economic, and political upheaval and campaigns to crack down on drugs. The course also investigates the growing trend to approach some drug and alcohol abuse as a medical problem and the rise of self-help societies and substance abuse rehabilitation. For example, we will examine state responses to opium use by middle class white women and Chinese immigrants during the 19th century, the passage and repeal of Prohibition, and the contemporary "War on Drugs."
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HIST 2460 : The Age of Suleiman the Magnificent
Crosslisted as: NES 2640 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Much has been written about the so-called "Golden Age" of the Ottoman Empire, some based on documentary evidence, while other based on the fertile imagination of foreign diplomats, artists, and historians alike. In this seminar, we will explore the myths surrounding the Age of Suleiman the Magnificent, and the role they have played in the telling of the popular history of the Middle East, and the so-called "rise and fall" of Islamic civilization. How do seemingly innocuous stories about the decadence of the court, the loose morality of the "oriental" and the imagined Harem continue to impact our perception of the so-called "East" and in what way do they still define some of the very questions even contemporary researchers and journalists ask? Relying on a combination of popular history books, academic monographs, critiques of the genre of the "history of great men," and works of  historical fiction, this seminar is meant to introduce undergraduate students interested in getting a sense of Ottoman popular history between 1500-1700, while being mindful of the power of storytelling in works of history and the perils of myth-making.
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HIST 2511 : Black Women to 1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 2511, ASRC 2511, FGSS 2511 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the social, cultural and communal lives of black women in North America, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade, and ending in 1900. Topics include Northern and Southern enslavement, first freedoms in the North, Southern emancipation, color consciousness, gener-cross racially and issues of class.
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HIST 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, ASRC 2512, FGSS 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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HIST 2521 : England's Age of Revolutions, 1500-1815
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Why did a relatively poor, marginal island garner a reputation for rebelliousness and embark on radical (though often failed) experiments in toleration and democracy over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? This course explores the social, religious and political upheavals that rocked the British Isles, from the Henrician reformation to the Glorious Revolution of 1688.  Topics include: the relationship of puritanism to political radicalism; the trial and execution of King Charles I, anti-Catholicism as an ideology; the twinned threats of theocracy and Cromwellian military rule; the role of the press and public opinion in early modern politics, the struggle for and limits of religious toleration, and the relationship of revolutions in England to violence in Scotland and Ireland. Finally, we will look at how the memory of earlier revolutions shaped British responses to the American and French Revolutions.
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HIST 2530 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2655, NES 2655, RELST 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
At the beginning of the 7th century, a new religion, Islam, appeared in Arabia and by the end of the century, Muslims had defeated the Byzantines and Persians and created an empire that stretched from Spain to India. For the next millennium, Islam glittered. Its caliphs, courts, and capitals were grander, more powerful, and more sophisticated than those of any medieval king, duke or prince. In this course, we will trace the emergence and development of Islamic civilization from the birth of Muhammad ca. 570 to the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. We will read the Qur'an and listen to its recitation; examine the career of the Prophet Muhammad; follow the course of the Arab conquests; explore the nature of the conflict between Sunnis and Shi'is; learn about the five pillars of Islam, sharia law, theology, and Sufism; and assess the achievements of Muslim intellectuals in literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy.
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HIST 2560 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2680 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
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HIST 2607 : Islam and Politics: Between an Islamic State and Daily Life
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2807, NES 2607, RELST 2617 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In the early twentieth century, a series of movements arose in the Middle East and South Asia, calling Muslims to return to Islam. Today, leaders and members of such groups –now known as Islamists –insist that one cannot live a fully Islamic life in the absence of an Islamic state. How and why did these movements come to focus on building an Islamic state? When did Islam come to be seen as indivisible from Politics, and what does it mean for Islam and Politics to be related? Are contemporary claims to Islam as the basis for political action consistent with the ways in which Muslims have understood their core texts historically? This course will introduce students to the study of Religion and Politics in Islamic History, beginning with the early Islamic community under the rule of the Prophet Muhammad, stretching through a period of rule that saw multiple Islamic Caliphates, and finally, reaching the present day. The bulk of this course, however, will focus on the diverse ways in which Muslims in the twentieth and twenty first centuries have laid claim to their religion as a template for political and social action. In particular, it will push students to consider how Muslim men and women live religion in their daily lives, whether through dress, prayer, or facial hair, and how these claims to religion shape political systems from the ground up.
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HIST 2630 : Histories of the Apocalypse: From Nostradamus to Nuclear Winter
Crosslisted as: RELST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Brexit, immigration, and the election of Donald Trump have all been recently heralded as signs of an imminent apocalypse. Films and fiction are saturated with images of zombies, environmental catastrophe, or nuclear disaster. Why are we so fascinated with the end of the world, and what is the genealogy of this imagery? What can visions of Armageddon tell us about past societal hopes and anxieties? How were they used to make claims about human nature and about who did and did not deserve salvation? This course traces apocalyptic thought from the Protestant reformation onwards, with a particular emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. Case studies range from radical millenarian sects to Chernobyl, and readings include all from Dostoevsky to Czech New Wave cinema. 
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HIST 2640 : Introduction to Asian American History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2130, AMST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introductory history of Chinese, Japanese, Asian Indians, Filipinos, and Koreans in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1990s. Major themes include racism and resistance, labor migration, community formation, imperialism, and struggles for equality.
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HIST 2641 : Race and Modern US History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2641, AMST 2645, ASRC 2631 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course surveys modern U.S. history, from Reconstruction to the contemporary period.  It will examine how race has been the terrain on which competing ideas of the American nation have been contested.  From struggles over citizenship rights to broader meanings of national belonging, we will explore how practices, ideas, and representations have shaped political, cultural, and social power.  A key concern for this course is examining how groups and individuals have pursued racial justice from the late-nineteenth century to the present.
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HIST 2650 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2675 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
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HIST 2660 : Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong: Unlearning Native American History
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2660, AMST 2660 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
One thing many Americans think they know is their Indians: Pocahontas, the First Thanksgiving, fighting cowboys, reservation poverty, and casino riches. Under our very noses, however, Native American history has evolved into one of the most exciting, dynamic, and contentious fields of inquiry into America's past. It is now safer to assume, as Comanche historian Paul Chaat Smith has pointed out, that everything you know about Indians is in fact wrong. Most people have much to "unlearn" about Native American history before true learning can take place. This course aims to achieve that end by (re)introducing students to key themes and trends in the history of North America's indigenous nations. Employing an issues-oriented approach, the course stresses the ongoing complexity of Native American societies' engagements with varieties of settler colonialism since 1492 and dedicates itself to a concerted program of myth-busting. As such, the course will provide numerous opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking and reading skills.
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HIST 2665 : The American Revolutionary Era
Crosslisted as: AMST 2665 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
As we approach the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, this course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the origins, character, and results of the American Revolution, as well as engaging the enduring significance of its memory in contemporary American life - why do we choose to remember the American Revolution in ways that occlude its divisive and bloody events? This course explores many of the key themes of this critical period of American history: the rise of colonial opposition to Great Britain, the nature of the Revolutionary Wars, and the domestic "republican experiment" that followed the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The course emphasizes student interpretations with an eye toward analyzing the comparative experiences of women and men, "everyday people" and famous leaders, Native Americans, African-Americans, and those who opposed the Revolution.
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HIST 2672 : The History and Politics of Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2670, GOVT 2673, NES 2670 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This lecture class will explore the socio-cultural history of modern Egypt from the late 18th century to the 21st century "Arab Spring." We will explore Egyptian history under the Ottomans and the Mamluks, the unsuccessful French attempts to colonize Egypt, and the successful British occupation of the country. We will then examine the development of Egyptian nationalism from the end of the 19th century through Nasser's pan-Arabism to the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. We will accomplish this with the aid of a variety of texts and media, including novels and films.
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HIST 2680 : The United States in the 1960s and 1970s
Crosslisted as: AMST 2682 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course explores the dramatic cultural, economic, and social upheavals in U.S. society during the 1960s and 1970s. It will primarily focus on the dynamic interactions between formal politics, the state, the economy, and the era's mass movements on the right and the left. Among other things, we will explore the history and legacy of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the Vietnam War, deindustrialization, "white flight," the War on Poverty, the War on Crime, Watergate, the "rise of the right," and women's changing roles.
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HIST 2742 : Cultures of the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2130 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
It's bad enough to run up against a border: at least you know where you stand. The frontier, however -- that fuzzy, murky zone that envelops the border while making its precise contours invisible -- is far more ambiguous, dangerous ground to tread. People, ideas, and other contraband criss-cross it; men (and sometimes women) make their own law; cultures clash and conspire together. At the margins of Europe -- Ireland, Wales, Scandinavia, Poland, Germany, the Low Countries, Spain, Sicily, the Levant -- medieval people discovered what every Trekkie knows: final frontiers, spaces of both oppression and opportunity. This course will explore some of the exchanges, friendly and otherwise, that took place at the edges of the medieval world, seeding many of the most radical developments which shaped the modern world.
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HIST 2749 : Mughal India and the Early Modern World, c. 1500-1800
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2274 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Starting with the appearance of European trading companies and the establishment of the Mughal empire around 1500 and ending with the establishment of British dominance by 1800, the readings focus on recent debates over India's place in a global economy in the early modern period. The three major themes emphasize 1) state-formation on the Indian subcontinent; 2) encounters with peoples from beyond the subcontinent through commercial, diplomatic, military and maritime activities; and 3) exchanges of consumer goods and aesthetic practices. 
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HIST 2750 : History of Modern India
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2275 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This introductory course is a broad survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from remnants of the Mughal empire through the end of the British empire into the postcolonial present. Prominent themes include the emergence of nonviolent protest, religious and regional identities, ethnic rivalries, social reform and the "woman question," deindustrialization, nationalism and the place of democracy and militarism in a region that includes two nuclear powers, India and Pakistan. 
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HIST 2760 : The British Empire
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course considers how a small northern European kingdom acquired and then governed a vast global empire. Beginning with the navigators, pirates and settlers of the Elizabethan era, and ending with the process of decolonization after World War Two, we will explore the diverse character and effects of British imperialism in the Americas, in Asia, in Africa, and the Pacific, and consider the legacies of the British empire in the contemporary world. 
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HIST 2791 : International Humanitarianism
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course studies international humanitarian and human rights activities from their origins to the present.  The ideological and social roots of humanitarian thought and action receive attention, as does the often-overlapping, sometimes conflictual relationship between humanitarianism and human rights advocacy.  Case studies will include the anti-slavery movement, the activities of faith-based groups, biographical studies of pioneering individuals, and the international response to the creation of refugees and to various genocides.
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HIST 2931 : China's Early Modern Empire
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2293, CAPS 2931 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Great Qing (1644-1911), a multi-ethnic empire that conquered China proper from the northeastern borderlands, expanded into central Asia, Mongolia, and Tibet, and consolidated the China-based empire's control over its southwestern frontiers. An heir to both Chinese and Inner Asian traditions, the Qing empire laid the foundation for the modern Chinese nation-state. In this course, students will focus on the political, legal, social, cultural, and intellectual aspects of China's last empire. Students will also locate the early modern Chinese empire in a regional and global context, examining its power influence in Korea and Southeast Asia, and its encounters and interactions with Western and Japanese imperialist powers. These encounters and interactions contributed to the domestic turmoil and foreign invasions that would eventually led to the decline and demise of the Chinese empire, but they also gave rise to new forces that would shape the fate of modern China in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
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HIST 2955 : Socialism in America
Crosslisted as: AMST 2955, ASRC 2955 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"Why no socialism in America?" Scholars and activists have long pondered the relative dearth (compared to other industrialized societies) of sustained, popular, anticapitalist activity in the United States. Sure, leftist movements in the U.S. have often looked and operated differently than those in other parts of the world. But many Americans have forged creative and vibrant traditions of anticapitalism under very difficult circumstances. This class examines socialist thought and practice in the U.S. from the 19th century to the present. We trace intersections of race, class, and gender while exploring the freedom dreams of those who have opposed capitalism in the very heart of global power.
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HIST 2970 : Imperial Russia
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course surveys the history of Imperial Russia, from its ninth-century Kievan beginnings to its rapid disintegration under the pressure of the First World War. Lectures will draw special attention to recurrent acts of revolutionary transformation that punctuate Russia's long tradition of "internal colonization." We will look at the creation of Russian culture, politics and society between the ninth century and the nineteenth as an exercise in empire-building — a project that originated with the enterprising princes of medieval Moscow, collapsed with the end of the Riurikid dynasty at the turn of the seventeenth century, spectacularly revived in eighteenth-century St. Petersburg, under the standard-bearer or the reforming Romanovs, Peter the Great, and eventually taken up by some of the most articulate representatives of a late-imperial intelligentsia whose dreams of Russian greatness were even more extravagant than those of the tsar. Topics for discussion include: the Russian translation of Greek Christianity, Russia's fraught relationship with Western Europe, the paradox of imperial modernization and the continual recourse, in Russian literary, musical, and visual cultures to an image of Russia as a frontier society without a state.
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HIST 2985 : Transformations in Twentieth Century China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2286, CAPS 2985 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The twentieth century was a time of unprecedented change in China as the country's ancient imperial system collapsed and a new modern order began to emerge. This course will explore the myriad transformations that occurred during this remarkable century of revolution and renewal. Among the major changes that we will focus on are the fall of the Qing dynasty, the intellectual awakening of May Fourth, the rise of the Nationalist party-state, and key events of the Communist era, such as the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution under Mao Zedong and the capitalist reforms of Deng Xiaoping. The class will encourage historical reflection on China's engagement with the modern world in order to better understand the complex reality of China today.
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HIST 3002 : Supervised Research - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised research with a history faculty member.  Student must complete an on-line Independent Study form with a faculty supervisor to determine requirements and for permission.  Students then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 3002 : Supervised Research - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised research with a history faculty member.  Student must complete an on-line Independent Study form with a faculty supervisor to determine requirements and for permission.  Students then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 3312 : What was the Vietnam War?
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
If you have ever wondered what the Vietnam War was all about, how did it begin, how was it fought, why was it so controversial, why did the American people turn against it, why was it important, why were generations of American students taught the North Vietnamese version of the war, why the South Vietnamese allies of the United States were abandoned, and what happened to the Vietnamese and the Americans as a result of the war—then this class is for you! With fresh eyes and surprising insights, it will take you beyond the fashionable fictions and clichés to look at the twenty-five years during which the United States, through six presidential administrations, was involved in Vietnamese affairs (1950-1975). For decades, Americans have been meditating on "the lessons of the Vietnam War," but it turns out that neither was any lesson ever learned nor were the so-called "lessons" even plausibly related to actual events. Today, Americans continue to be taught myths about the Vietnam War. This course shows why these myths obstruct a realistic understanding of American history during the past half-century.
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HIST 3542 : The Ottoman Empire 1800-1922
Crosslisted as: NES 3542 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course will take the students through the age of reforms in the Ottoman Empire, the rising of nationalism, and the encroachment of colonialism in the Middle East, North Africa and the Balkans, and the collapse of the empire. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing various historical narratives of ethno-religious nationalism using Turkey, Greece/Cyprus, and Lebanon, as case studies. 
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HIST 3652 : African Economic Development Histories
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3652 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What impact did Africa's involvement in the slave trade and its colonization by Europe have on its long-term economic health? What role have post-independence political decisions made within Africa and by multinational economic actors (the World Bank and the IMF, for example) had on altering the trajectory of Africa's economic history? Does China's recent heavy investment in Africa portend a movement away from or a continuation of Africa's economic underdevelopment? These questions and others will be addressed in this course. 
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HIST 3710 : World War II in Europe
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Second World War remains the single most important set of events shaping the contemporary world. The course deals with both the events of World War II as they shaped European and world history and the way those events were remembered and commemorated in postwar years. Lectures, screenings, and readings will examine: the role of wartime political leaders and military commanders; the experience of war and occupation for soldiers and civilians, including Resistance movements and collaborators; Nazi genocide; intellectual and cultural changes during the war, including the impact on literature and philosophy; strategic questions about the origins and conduct of the war; the concluding phases involving the Nuremberg Trials, the Yalta and Potsdam conferences, and the launching of the Cold War; and the representation of the war in subsequent films, literature, and political culture.
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HIST 3870 : The History of Consumption: From Wedgwood to Wal-Mart
Crosslisted as: AMST 3870 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Whether buying at a general store, shopping at a department store, or loitering at a mall, consumption has always formed an important part of the American experience. More than just commodities bought and sold, consumption is also about the institutions, social practices, cultural meanings, and economic functions that have surrounded the merchandise. This course will look at the changing meanings consumption has had for life, politics, and economy in the US over the past 300 years.
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HIST 3960 : Transnational Local: Southeast Asian History from the Eighteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3396, ASIAN 6696, HIST 6960 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Surveys the modern history of Southeast Asia with special attention to colonialism, the Chinese diaspora, and socio-cultural institutions.  Considers global transformations that brought "the West" into people's lives in Southeast Asia.  Focuses on the development of the modern nation-state, but also questions the narrative by incorporating groups that are typically excluded.  Assigns primary texts in translation. 
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HIST 4000 : Introduction to Historical Research
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is an introduction to the theory, practice, and art of historical research and writing. One key purpose of this course is to prepare students to work on longer research projects—especially an Honors Thesis. We will analyze the relationship between evidence and argument in historical writing; assess the methods and possible biases in various examples of historical writing; identify debates and sources relevant to research problems; think about how to use sources creatively; and discuss the various methodological issues associated with historical inquiry, analysis, and presentation.
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HIST 4000 : Introduction to Historical Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar is an introduction to the theory, practice, and art of historical research and writing. One key purpose of this course is to prepare students to work on longer research projects—especially an Honors Thesis. We will analyze the relationship between evidence and argument in historical writing; assess the methods and possible biases in various examples of historical writing; identify debates and sources relevant to research problems; think about how to use sources creatively; and discuss the various methodological issues associated with historical inquiry, analysis, and presentation.
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HIST 4001 : Honors Guidance
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides structure for the student's research and introduces them to research techniques. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the History Department's Honors Program.
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HIST 4002 : Honors Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is designed to facilitate student's successful completion of their History Department Honors theses through regular deadlines and small group writing workshops.
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HIST 4091 : Contesting Identities in Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4650, NES 4605, NES 6605 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines the dynamics of modern collective identities which dominated the Egyptian public sphere in the long twentieth century. We will explore the underpinnings and formation of territorial Egyptian nationalism, pan-Arabism and Islamism through close readings and class discussions of important theoretical, historiographical and primary texts.
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HIST 4120 : Scientific Revolution in Early - Modern Europe
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4121, STS 4120 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Modern science is often seen as having been originally developed in Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Copernicus, who set the Earth in motion around the sun in the early 16th century, and Newton, who made the universe an infinite expanse filled with gravitational attractive forces, at the end of the 17th, frame this crucial period of European expansion. The new universe was invented at the same time as the discovery and exploitation of the New World and the establishment of new trading relationships with the East. This course, a weekly 400-level seminar, examines the new ideas and approaches to nature promoted by European philosophers and mathematicians as part of this outward-looking enterprise aimed at the practical command of the world. We will read works by such people as Copernicus, Kepler, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and others, as well as important secondary literature, in order to understand how European thought attempted to integrate nature, God, and the state into new ways of making usable knowledge of the world.
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HIST 4127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 4127, FGSS 6127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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HIST 4203 : Contesting Votes: Democracy and Citizenship Throughout U.S. History
Crosslisted as: AMST 4203 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This advanced seminar traces transformations in citizenship and the franchise throughout U.S. history. Through readings, frequent short writings, discussion, and a final paper, the class examines the struggles over who can claim full citizenship and legitimate voice in the political community. It examines the divergent, often clashing, visions of legitimate democratic rule, focusing particularly on the debates over who should vote and on what terms.  We examine the dynamics that have shaped the boundaries of citizenship and hierarchies within it, paying attention to changes in the civic status of Native Americans, property-less white men, paupers, women, African Americans, various immigrant groups, residents of U.S. colonies, felons, and people with intellectual disabilities. A significant portion of the class focuses on debates about U.S. democracy in the decades after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
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HIST 4233 : The Holocaust in Postwar Culture (1945-1961)
Crosslisted as: COML 4415, FREN 4415, GERST 4411, GOVT 4786, JWST 4410, ROMS 4410 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
HIST 4390 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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HIST 4405 : Magic and Demonic Creatures between Reformation and Enlightenment
Crosslisted as: RELST 4404 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course examines beliefs in magic and magical creatures, looking at how the occult organized all aspects of early modern life.  Scientists believed that magic could help them create gold, doctors practiced blood magic, and court magistrates sentenced Jews or elderly women to death for allegedly performing devilish rituals on small children. Through the course readings, both primary and secondary, we will analyze how the superstitious was mobilized within struggles between Catholics and Protestants, the nobility and the peasantry, and within emergent Enlightenment philosophy.  In particular we will discuss why witches or werewolves were imagined (and hunted) in the period, what that can tell us about the cultural climate of the time, but also how their meaning could morph into the familiar horror stapes of our own world.
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HIST 4428 : The Formation of the Field: Japan as Area
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4428 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide both a historical introduction to and critical analysis of the constitution of Japanese Studies as a "field" of postwar academic inquiry. While reading texts particularly influential in the early and contemporary formation of the field, we will consider such questions as the domestic and international contexts in which Japanese studies has been institutionalized and maintained, and the relationship between "Japan" as an object of area studies discourse and "Japan" as represented in American journalism, popular culture, and politics. The course will examine the historical origins of area studies and various critiques conducted about area studies as a model of academic discipline. Possibilities for cross-disciplinary research (along lines recently undertaken in fields such as feminist criticism and cultural studies) will also be explored.
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HIST 4460 : Strategy in World War II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Strategic decision-making in World War II. The course will be organized into a "task force" addressing crucial problems faced by the European-American Allies in World War II: the invasion of northwest Europe, strategic bombing tactics, the rescue of European Jews, and coordination with the Soviet Union. Individual papers and presentations to the group and to panels at Cornell and in Washington, D.C. 
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HIST 4525 : Historicizing Communism
Crosslisted as: FREN 4525, FREN 6525, HIST 6525, ITAL 4520, ITAL 6520, ROMS 4260, ROMS 6525, SPAN 4525, SPAN 6525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Communism merged multiple theories, events and experiences.  It's complexity does not lie exclusively in the discrepancies that separate the communist idea from its historical embodiments; it lies in the diversity of its expressions.  Sketching its "anatomy," this seminar will distinguish at least four broad forms of communism, interrelated and not necessarily opposed to one another, but different enugh to be recognized on their own: communism as revolution, communism as regime, communism as anti-colonialism and communism as a varient of social democracy.  The October Revolution was their common matrix, but their trajectories have been different.  Exploring communism as a global experience, we will shape the profile of one of the central actors of the twentieth century.
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HIST 4628 : Authority and Anonymity: Historical Reflections on a Historically Variable Relationship
Crosslisted as: HIST 6628, SHUM 4628, SHUM 6628 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Authority and authorship: the similarity of the words alone suggests a close connection. But what happens to the authority of a text when its author is unknown? The proposed seminar combines methods derived from the history of the book, literary studies, and cultural and social history in exploring this question. As one might expect, there is no singular answer. Cases will be examined in which authorial evasiveness or reticence undermine the authority of a text while other cases will illustrate how authority has been enhanced by anonymity or anonymous contributions (one thinks, for example, of blind peer review in an academic context). Furthermore, the course will also go beyond the domain of the text by examining authority and anonymity in non-textual contexts.
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HIST 4632 : Emperors, Kings, and Warlords: Political Legitimacy at the End of the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4602, HIST 6632, MEDVL 4632, MEDVL 6632, SHUM 4632, SHUM 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will analyze the transition between the late Roman empire and the barbarian kingdoms in western Europe from the perspective of how rulers, intellectuals, and common people understood legitimate and illegitimate political authority. The so-called "Dark Ages" (4th-7th centuries) were a vibrant period of creativity and reinvention. Class discussion will focus on primary source analysis, and how ethnic (Roman/Germanic), religious (Christian/non-Christian), gender, and other categories informed late antique notions of political authority. We will also discuss how notions of rulership were deployed to challenge emperors and kings. Knowledge of late antique and early medieval political ideas is crucial to understanding modern uses of the so-called "Western" past in current political debates.
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HIST 4634 : Curating the British Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4720, ARTH 6720, BSOC 4634, HIST 6634, SHUM 4634, SHUM 6634, STS 4634, STS 6634 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course places museums within the history of capitalism. It examines the economic dimension of the emergence of the modern museum as a site of cultural and scientific authority. We will consider a range of case studies investigating the varied roles that economic interest has played in shaping the history of collecting.  Chronologically, the course will range from the trade in curiosities for early modern cabinets to the corporate investment in blockbuster exhibitions of the present day. Geographically, we focus on collections in Europe, South and Southeast Asia, and will also draw important lessons from the global trade in goods and artifacts and recent attempts to regulate that trade. 
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HIST 4751 : Science, Race, and Colonialism
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course is divided into three major thematic sections. The first looks at the history of racial thinking in the West. We begin with the existence (or not) of conceptions of biological race in the early- modern period, focusing on early voyages of discovery and so-called "first encounters" between the peoples of the Old and New Worlds.  In the second part of the course we will look at early enunciations of racial thought in the late 18th century and at the problems of classification that these raised, before examining the roots of "Scientific Racism." We close with a look at Darwin, Social Darwinism, and eugenics movements in different national contexts.  The last third of the course looks at science and technology in colonial contexts, including "colonial technologies" (guns, steam- ships, and telegraphs) as well as medicine and public hygiene.
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HIST 4761 : Anglo-Saxon England
Crosslisted as: HIST 6761, MEDVL 4761, MEDVL 6761 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The people who invaded the isle of Britain after the withdrawal of Roman government in the early fifth century, and who dominated it until the establishment of Norman rule in the late eleventh century, are responsible for some of the best-known and most enduring legacies of the Middle Ages: Beowulf and Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the archbishoprics of Canterbury and York, Alfred the Great and Æthelred the Unready. This course examines the Anglo-Saxons in their early-medieval context, focusing especially on the cooperation between history and its sister disciplines – archaeology, literary criticism, and others – that is so vital for shedding light on this distant, opaque era. 
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HIST 4772 : China Imagined: The Historical and Global Origins of the Chinese Nation
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4478, ASIAN 6679, CAPS 4772, HIST 6772 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
As China, with its "China Dream," rises in power on the global stage, what "China" means to its inhabitants and outsiders has become an issue increasingly relevant to business, international relations, and cultural exchange, and a topic that draws intensive attention from historians and social scientists. This course brings together undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in shifting meanings embedded in the concept of "China," either as part of their research agenda, or as a useful lens for comparative analysis. Focus will be on how China as an Empire/ a Nation was conceptualized by different people in different periods and in different contexts, and on the reality and representation of China as political, cultural, racial, and geographical entities.
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HIST 4851 : Refugees
Crosslisted as: AMST 4851, HIST 6851, LSP 4851, LSP 6851 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Since World War II, over 4 million people have migrated to the United States as refugees. In this seminar we will examine some of these refugee migrations and the ways these migrations challenged our understanding of the United States as a "haven for the oppressed." We will examine the crafting of refugee/asylum policy, the role of nongovernmental actors in influencing policy, and the ways policy reflected foreign-policy interests and security concerns. The last weeks of the course will pay particular attention to our changing definitions of who 'merits' asylum in the United States since the end of the Cold War.
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HIST 4922 : Ocean: The Sea in Human History
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course focuses on the role of the oceans in human history, from earliest times to the present.  It does so by moving both chronologically and topically through oceanic history, so that a number of important topics are covered.  We start by looking at a number of different methodologies that may be useful in examining the sea, and then proceed to week-long reading sections on the sea in the ancient world, the Age of Discovery (European and non-European), and at the science of the sea.  The second half of the course gets more geographic in focus: week-long sessions deliberate on individual oceans and the main themes that have driven them, covering the Atlantic, the Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the polar seas.  Slavery, piracy, discovery, cultural transmission, nautics and science are a part of all of these stories, though in different ways.  The course hopes to impart to students the overwhelmingly important role of the oceans in forging human history, both in the centuries that have past and in our modern world.  Open to all students with an interest in the sea.
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HIST 4931 : Vitality and Power in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4429, BSOC 4911, CAPS 4931, HIST 6931, RELST 4931, STS 4911 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Chinese discourses have long linked the circulation of cosmic energies, political power, and bodily vitalities. In these models political order, spiritual cultivation, and health are achieved and enhanced through harmonizing these flows across the levels of Heaven-and-Earth, state, and humankind. It is when these movements are blocked or out of synchrony that we find disordered climates, societies, and illness. In this course, we will examine the historical emergence and development of these models of politically resonant persons and bodily centered polities, reading across primary texts in translation from these otherwise often separated fields. For alternate frameworks of analysis as well as for comparative perspectives, we will also examine theories of power and embodiment from other cultures, including recent scholarship in anthropology and critical theory.
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HIST 4950 : Gender, Power, and Authority in England, 1600 to 1800
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4950, HIST 6905 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
It is a truism that early modern society was a 'patriarchal' one in which men had authority -- but how did that authority operate and what were its limits? How did the exercise of power between men and women intersect with religious, literary, legal and political institutions? We will approach these questions chronologically, examining the impact of the Reformation, the English Revolution, the Enlightenment, the rise of middle class and polite culture. We will also explore them methodologically and generically, with an eye to how different kinds of evidence and sources can produce different kinds of conclusions. Historians' hypotheses will be tested by analysis of primary sources.
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HIST 6000 : Graduate Research Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar is devoted entirely to the writing of a substantive research paper, the dissertation prospectus, or fellowship proposal. Students will share research proposals, annotated bibliographies, outlines and portions of rough drafts. Class meetings will be devoted to discussing what students have produced, and general issues associated with constructing the dissertation prospectus and research papers.
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HIST 6006 : History Colloquium Series
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 6006 : History Colloquium Series
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
HIST 6127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 4127, FGSS 6127, HIST 4127 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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HIST 6132 : Mobility, Circulation, Migration, Diaspora: Global Connections
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6132 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This graduate seminar seeks to familiarize students with some of the most recent takes on transnational history that have emphasized the experiences of individuals and groups whose lives were affected by mobility across political boundaries. An explicit aim of the seminar is to use these border-crossing lives as a way to develop a critique of conventional areas studies frameworks and to explore the possibilities of imagining (geographically and otherwise) a different world (or multiple different ways of organizing global space). Since most of the readings will concentrate on the pre-nineteenth century world, the seminar will also offer students tools to rethink conventional narratives of the rise of a globalized world that tend to emphasize the second half of the nineteenth century as the birth of the global world. Globalization, this course will demonstrate, was happening long before most accepted narratives assert.
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HIST 6300 : Topics in Ancient History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7682, NES 6642 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The seminar's purpose is to provide a general introduction to problems and methods, with a strong emphasis on reading and using primary sources.
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HIST 6321 : Black Power Movement and Transnationalism
Crosslisted as: AMST 6321, ASRC 6321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar explores the international and transnational dimensions of the Black Power Movement, broadly defined. Beginning with an examination of transnationalism in the early 20th century, it examines the thought and political activities of African-American intellectuals and activists who crossed national boundaries, figuratively and literally, in the quest for black freedom. We will focus on the postwar era, particularly the 1950s through the 1980s, exploring transnationalism in the context of black feminism, Marxism, black nationalism, Pan Africanism, and other political traditions. We will examine the meeting and mingling of transnational discourses, ideologies, and activists in North America, the Caribbean, and Africa. 
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HIST 6391 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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HIST 6481 : Topics in Latin American History
Crosslisted as: LATA 6481 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Topic:  Readings in the social history of modern Latin America. This course is an intensive readings seminar primarily for, but in no way limited to, graduate students preparing for minor and major fields in Latin American history. The seminar has three basic objectives:  1. to provide you with the opportunity to read and discuss works with which you should be familiar for your examination fields: this includes works considered seminal in the field;  revisionist works that challenge and/or expand such interpretations; and very recent works that hint at new directions in the field;  2. to delineate a number of the most prominent thematic emphases, methodological approaches, and debates characteristic of the field since the 1960s;  3. to situate these themes and methods in relation to broader developments in the discipline of history.  Undergraduate students welcome with permission of instructor. Graduate students from any fields and/or disciplines welcome.
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HIST 6511 : Global Early Modernity
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will examine recent historical works that emphasize the global connectedness of early modern histories. We will read works in global history, as well as studies in the comparative or connected history of different regions of the world. Major themes for discussion will include cross-cultural encounters, mobility and travel, the growth of global commerce, and early modern empires.
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HIST 6525 : Historicizing Communism
Crosslisted as: FREN 4525, FREN 6525, HIST 4525, ITAL 4520, ITAL 6520, ROMS 4260, ROMS 6525, SPAN 4525, SPAN 6525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Communism merged multiple theories, events and experiences.  It's complexity does not lie exclusively in the discrepancies that separate the communist idea from its historical embodiments; it lies in the diversity of its expressions.  Sketching its "anatomy," this seminar will distinguish at least four broad forms of communism, interrelated and not necessarily opposed to one another, but different enugh to be recognized on their own: communism as revolution, communism as regime, communism as anti-colonialism and communism as a varient of social democracy.  The October Revolution was their common matrix, but their trajectories have been different.  Exploring communism as a global experience, we will shape the profile of one of the central actors of the twentieth century.
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HIST 6531 : The History of Capitalism: The US Case in Perspective
Crosslisted as: AMST 6531 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course takes a theoretical (what are some of the key understandings of capitalism?), methodological (how should we study it?), and case study approach to the history of capitalism in the United States and beyond. The History of Capitalism has become a major research field in the last decade and in this course we will examine the new historiography, as well as the older scholarship (Polanyi, Braudel, and other works) on which it is built.  While the main focus will be on the history of the United States, we will examine this development comparatively and in the context of the rich literature in other parts of the world. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the history of capitalism approach to analyzing and understanding American history. Along the way we will examine how it relates to other topics such as the history of slavery and work, consumerism and identity, neoliberalism and political economy, and intellectual and cultural history.  Students in other departments and history graduate students who are not specialists in US history are encouraged to take this course.
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HIST 6548 : City-Scapes of the Late Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6548, NES 6548 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is intended for Graduate students who are interested in exploring notions of space and place within the context of the late Ottoman Empire. Going beyond the examination of the "Islamic city" this seminar will bring theoretical readings about place making, in Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East, to bear on the late Ottoman case. From the urban frontiers of the empire to the capital, Istanbul, this seminar will tackle the latest in historical research on the late Ottoman Empire's parks, public monuments, city planning, public/private space, Ottoman official buildings, the "Turkish house," the "Arab house," city soundscapes, amongst others. We will critically examine how recent studies are re-shaping historians' knowledge of urban spaces and mental map of this vast empire.
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HIST 6617 : Seminar in Asian Literature and History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 6671 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course offers graduate students an opportunity to consider ways for analyzing texts from Asia, both modern and pre-modern, both literary and historiographical. The emphasis will be on how narratives are constructed, how the form and content of narratives are related, and how narratives express unstated or hidden authorial intentions. Students will read books and essays on theories of narrative, translation, and ideological analysis. Students will discuss these readings and write essays about them. And students will write a research term paper based on study of a selected Asian text in its original Asian language.
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HIST 6628 : Authority and Anonymity: Historical Reflections on a Historically Variable Relationship
Crosslisted as: HIST 4628, SHUM 4628, SHUM 6628 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Authority and authorship: the similarity of the words alone suggests a close connection. But what happens to the authority of a text when its author is unknown? The proposed seminar combines methods derived from the history of the book, literary studies, and cultural and social history in exploring this question. As one might expect, there is no singular answer. Cases will be examined in which authorial evasiveness or reticence undermine the authority of a text while other cases will illustrate how authority has been enhanced by anonymity or anonymous contributions (one thinks, for example, of blind peer review in an academic context). Furthermore, the course will also go beyond the domain of the text by examining authority and anonymity in non-textual contexts.
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HIST 6632 : Emperors, Kings, and Warlords: Political Legitimacy at the End of the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4602, HIST 4632, MEDVL 4632, MEDVL 6632, SHUM 4632, SHUM 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will analyze the transition between the late Roman empire and the barbarian kingdoms in western Europe from the perspective of how rulers, intellectuals, and common people understood legitimate and illegitimate political authority. The so-called "Dark Ages" (4th-7th centuries) were a vibrant period of creativity and reinvention. Class discussion will focus on primary source analysis, and how ethnic (Roman/Germanic), religious (Christian/non-Christian), gender, and other categories informed late antique notions of political authority. We will also discuss how notions of rulership were deployed to challenge emperors and kings. Knowledge of late antique and early medieval political ideas is crucial to understanding modern uses of the so-called "Western" past in current political debates.
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HIST 6634 : Curating the British Empire
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4720, ARTH 6720, BSOC 4634, HIST 4634, SHUM 4634, SHUM 6634, STS 4634, STS 6634 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course places museums within the history of capitalism. It examines the economic dimension of the emergence of the modern museum as a site of cultural and scientific authority. We will consider a range of case studies investigating the varied roles that economic interest has played in shaping the history of collecting.  Chronologically, the course will range from the trade in curiosities for early modern cabinets to the corporate investment in blockbuster exhibitions of the present day. Geographically, we focus on collections in Europe, South and Southeast Asia, and will also draw important lessons from the global trade in goods and artifacts and recent attempts to regulate that trade. 
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HIST 6761 : Anglo-Saxon England
Crosslisted as: HIST 4761, MEDVL 4761, MEDVL 6761 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The people who invaded the isle of Britain after the withdrawal of Roman government in the early fifth century, and who dominated it until the establishment of Norman rule in the late eleventh century, are responsible for some of the best-known and most enduring legacies of the Middle Ages: Beowulf and Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the archbishoprics of Canterbury and York, Alfred the Great and Æthelred the Unready. This course examines the Anglo-Saxons in their early-medieval context, focusing especially on the cooperation between history and its sister disciplines – archaeology, literary criticism, and others – that is so vital for shedding light on this distant, opaque era.
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Description
HIST 6772 : China Imagined: The Historical and Global Origins of the Chinese Nation
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4478, ASIAN 6679, CAPS 4772, HIST 4772 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
As China, with its "China Dream," rises in power on the global stage, what "China" means to its inhabitants and outsiders has become an issue increasingly relevant to business, international relations, and cultural exchange, and a topic that draws intensive attention from historians and social scientists. This course brings together undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in shifting meanings embedded in the concept of "China," either as part of their research agenda, or as a useful lens for comparative analysis. Focus will be on how China as an Empire/ a Nation was conceptualized by different people in different periods and in different contexts, and on the reality and representation of China as political, cultural, racial, and geographical entities.
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HIST 6851 : Refugees
Crosslisted as: AMST 4851, HIST 4851, LSP 4851, LSP 6851 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Since World War II, over 4 million people have migrated to the United States as refugees. In this seminar we will examine some of these refugee migrations and the ways these migrations challenged our understanding of the United States as a "haven for the oppressed." We will examine the crafting of refugee/asylum policy, the role of nongovernmental actors in influencing policy, and the ways policy reflected foreign-policy interests and security concerns. The last weeks of the course will pay particular attention to our changing definitions of who 'merits' asylum in the United States since the end of the Cold War.
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HIST 6905 : Gender, Power, and Authority in England 1600-1800
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4950, HIST 4950 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
HIST 6931 : Vitality and Power in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4429, BSOC 4911, CAPS 4931, HIST 4931, RELST 4931, STS 4911 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Chinese discourses have long linked the circulation of cosmic energies, political power, and bodily vitalities. In these models political order, spiritual cultivation, and health are achieved and enhanced through harmonizing these flows across the levels of Heaven-and-Earth, state, and humankind. It is when these movements are blocked or out of synchrony that we find disordered climates, societies, and illness. In this course, we will examine the historical emergence and development of these models of politically resonant persons and bodily centered polities, reading across primary texts in translation from these otherwise often separated fields. For alternate frameworks of analysis as well as for comparative perspectives, we will also examine theories of power and embodiment from other cultures, including recent scholarship in anthropology and critical theory.
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HIST 6960 : Transnational Local: Southeast Asian History from the Eighteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3396, ASIAN 6696, HIST 3960 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Surveys the modern history of Southeast Asia with special attentions to colonialism, the Chinese diaspora, and socio-cultural institutions. Considers global transformations that brought "the West" into people's lives in Southeast Asia. Focuses on the development of the modern nation-state, but also questions the narrative by incorporating groups that are typically excluded. Assigns primary texts in translation.
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HIST 7000 : Special Topic 3: Issues in the Cultural History of Technology
Crosslisted as: STS 7003 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The special topic for this semester's seminar is The History of Digitalization.  We will read mostly secondary sources on the transition from analog to digital forms of electronic media, focusing on the United States.   We begin with the (digital) telegraph system of the 19th century as a reminder that the historical arc we are studying ran from digital to analog to digital (not simply analog to digital).  We then consider the analog telephone system and analog computing of the early to mid-20th century, before spending the remainder of the course on the digitization of communications, computation, and the media from World War II to the present.  We consider the social, cultural, political, and economic, aspects of the construction and use of these technologies.
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HIST 7090 : Introduction to the Graduate Study of History
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to introduce entering graduate students to crucial issues and problems in historical methodology that cut across various areas of specialization.
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HIST 7110 : Introduction to Science and Technology Studies
Crosslisted as: STS 7111 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Provides students with a foundation in the field of science and technology studies. Using classic works as well as contemporary exemplars, seminar participants chart the terrain of this new field. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, historiography of science and technology and their relation to social studies of science and technology, laboratory studies, intellectual property, science and the state, the role of instruments, fieldwork, politics and technical knowledge, philosophy of science, sociological studies of science and technology, and popularization.
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HIST 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 7937, STS 7937 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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HIST 8010 : Independent Study-PIRIP
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 8010 : Independent Study-PIRIP
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description