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History Faculty Books

Getting Tough: Welfare and Imprisonment in 1970s America

Overview

In 1970s America, politicians began "getting tough" on drugs, crime, and welfare. These campaigns helped expand the nation's penal system, discredit welfare programs, and cast blame for the era's social upheaval on racialized deviants that the state was not accountable to serve or represent. Getting Tough sheds light on how this unprecedented growth of the penal system and the evisceration of the nation's welfare programs developed hand in hand. Julilly Kohler-Hausmann shows that these historical events were animated by struggles over how to interpret and respond to the inequality and disorder that crested during this period.

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Brahmin Capitalism

Overview

Tracking the movement of finance capital toward far-flung investment frontiers, Noam Maggor reconceives the emergence of modern capitalism in the United States. Brahmin Capitalism reveals the decisive role of established wealth in the transformation of the American economy in the decades after the Civil War, leading the way to the nationally integrated corporate capitalism of the twentieth century.

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The Odd Man Karakozov Imperial Russia, Modernity, and the Birth of Terrorism

Overview

Through a microhistorical investigation of the April 4, 1866, attempted assassination of Tsar Alexander II, The Odd Man Karakozov shows terrorism as a phenomenon inextricably linked to the foundations of the modern world: capitalism, enlightened law and scientific reason, ideology, technology, new media, and above all, people's participation in politics and in the making of history.

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The Cry of the Renegade

Overview

On October 1, 1920, the city of Santiago, Chile, came to a halt as tens of thousands stopped work and their daily activities to join the funeral procession of José Domingo Gómez Rojas, a 24 year old university student and acclaimed poet.

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An Aqueous Territory

Overview

An Aqueous Territory traces the configuration of a geographic space, the transimperial Greater Caribbean between 1760 and 1860. Focusing on the Caribbean coast of New Granada (present-day Colombia), An Aqueous Territory shows that the region's residents did not live their lives bounded by geopolitical borders. 

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Bones around My Neck

Overview

Prince Prisdang Chumsai (1852–1935) served as Siam's first diplomat to Europe during the most dramatic moment of Siam’s political history, when its independence was threatened by European imperialism. Despite serving with patriotic zeal, he suffered irreparable social and political ruin based on rumors about fiscal corruption, sexual immorality, and political treason. Bones around My Neck pursues the truth behind these rumors, which chased Prisdang out of Siam. The book recounts the personal and political adventures of an unwitting provocateur who caused a commotion in every country he inhabited.

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The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and the Hijaz

Overview

The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and the Hijaz focuses on the empire’s efforts to reinvent itself on the international stage through the use of international law, interimperial diplomacy, and interpersonal relations with local chiefs, Sufi order leaders, kings, and sultans in Europe, the Sahara, and the Red Sea Basin. This work gives a new perspective on the study of imperialism by focusing on the inter- and interaimperial relations in the Ottoman context, south-south dimension of colonialism in Africa and the Middle East, and the shift from “old” to “new” imperial models of rule along the empire’s frontiers-cum-borderlands at the turn of the 20th century.

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The Hajj Pilgrimage in Islam

Overview

The Hajj is the single largest agglomeration of human beings on the planet; every year, some three million Muslims now head from their homes to Mecca and Medina to pray in the great mosques of the Arabian desert.  This book chronicles their story from a global vantage, looking at geographies, institutions, and aspirations across the Muslim world as these all relate to the holy pilgrimage.

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We Are an African People

Overview

  • An intellectual history of subaltern education, a critical analysis of the fate of Black Power ideologies in the post-segregation era, and a portrait of African-American self-activity at the neighborhood level.
  • Puts forth a groundbreaking explanation of Black Power's preoccupation with forging a new people. Spans the last four decades of the 20th century with a focus on the 1970s.

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The Bare-Sarked Warrior: A Brief Cultural History of Battlefield Exposure

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On the shores of medieval North America, two civilizations — Norse and Native — clash. The descendants of the Vikings who had terrorized Europe break and run, quaking in the face of the unknown. Then a lone woman steps in, acting in a most unpredictable way to turn the tide. She is Freydís Eiríksdóttir, the first in a series of bare-sarked warriors whom this book explores. In their darkest hours, as societies teeter on the edge, these paradoxical saviors emerge to perform an alchemical swap: they substitute domesticated, gendered trouble for an unspeakable alien menace. Tracing their topos over a millennium or two, four continents, and a dozen or so languages, this book is about these women’s struggles, their triumphs, and the prices they pay.

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Death of Caesar: The Story of History’s Most Famous Assassination

Overview

"The book offers the most detailed account of the assassination to date as well as a reassessment of the assassins: who they were, what they wanted and why they failed to build on their successful murder. Critically acclaimed, The Death of Caesar has been translated into six languages.”

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Africa and World War II

Overview

This volume considers the military, economic, and political significance of Africa during World War II. The essays feature new research and innovative approaches to the historiography of Africa and bring to the fore issues of race, gender, and labor during the war, topics that have not yet received much critical attention.

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A Scrap of Paper

Overview

Scrap analyzes the effect of international law on the origins and conduct of World War I, comparing Imperial Germany, Britain, and France and using voluminous archival records.  The book seeks to restore the importance of international law to The Great War, a fact that all contemporaries knew, but that we have forgotten.

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A Plague of Informers Conspiracy and Political Trust in William III's England

Overview

Stories of plots, sham plots, and the citizen-informers who discovered them are at the center of this compelling study of the turbulent decade following the Revolution of 1688. By encouraging informers, imposing loyalty oaths, suspending habeas corpus, and delaying the long-promised reform of treason trial procedure, the Williamite regime protected itself from enemies and cemented its bonds with supporters, but also put its own credibility at risk.

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Chinese Medicine and Healing

Overview

This volume, with eight chronologically-arranged chapters and two on globalization, follows historical developments in a wide range of health interventions, including propitiation of disease-inflicting spirits, divination, vitality-cultivating disciplines, herbal remedies, and acupuncture. Inserted vignettes bring to life such diverse arenas of health care as childbirth in the Tang period, Yuan state-established medical schools, and the search for sexual potency in the People’s Republic.

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Christians and Their Many Identities in Late Antiquity, North Africa, 200–450 CE

Overview

Christians and Their Many Identities in Late Antiquity, North Africa, 200–450 CE explores how Christians in North Africa between the age of Tertullian and the age of Augustine were selective in identifying as Christian, giving salience to their religious identity only intermittently. By shifting the focus from groups to individuals, Rebillard more broadly questions the existence of bounded, stable, and homogeneous groups based on Christianness.

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West African Narratives of Slavery: Texts from Late Nineteenth-and Early Twentieth-Century Ghana

Overview

Slavery in Africa existed for hundreds of years before it was abolished in the late nineteenth century. Yet, we know little about how enslaved individuals, especially those who never left Africa talked about their experiences.  This unprecedented study affords unique insights into how ordinary West African understood and talked about their lives during a time of change and upheaval.

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Citizens of A Christian Nation

Overview

Citizens of a Christian Nation brings together for the first time African American and Chinese American religious histories through a multitiered local, regional, national, and even transnational analysis of race, nationalism, and evangelical thought and practice.

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The Edge of the Woods: Iroquoia, 1534-1701

Overview

In The Edge of the Woods: Iroquoia, 1534-1701, Jon Parmenter argues that the extensive spatial mobility engaged in by Haudenosaunee people after their first contact with Europeans represented a geographical expression of Haudenosaunee social, political, and economic priorities. Parmenter drew on archival and published documents in several languages, archaeological data, published Haudenosaunee oral traditions, and GIS technology to reconstruct the Haudenosaunee settlement landscape and the paths of human mobility that built and sustained it. 

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Satchmo Blows Up the World Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War

Overview

At the height of the ideological antagonism of the Cold War, the U.S. State Department unleashed an unexpected tool in its battle against Communism: jazz. From 1956 through the late 1970s, America dispatched its finest jazz musicians to the far corners of the earth, from Iraq to India, from the Congo to the Soviet Union, in order to win the hearts and minds of the Third World and to counter perceptions of American racism.Though intended as a color-blind promotion of democracy, this unique Cold War strategy unintentionally demonstrated the essential role of African Americans in U.S. national culture. Through the tales of these tours, Von Eschen captures the fascinating interplay between the efforts of the State Department and the progressive agendas of the artists themselves, as all struggled to redefine a more inclusive and integrated American nation on the world stage.

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