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Mostafa Minawi

Assistant Professor

Mcgraw Hall, Room 348

mm2492@cornell.edu
607-254-1275

Website(s)

Overview

My research interests range from the macro transimperial approach in imperial history to the micro biographical/experiential history of living at the end of the Age of Empire. My first book, The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and the Hijaz focuses on the empire’s efforts to reinvent itself on the international stage through the use of international law, interimperial diplomacy, and interpersonal relations with local chiefs, Sufi order leaders, kings, and sultans in Europe, the Sahara, and the Red Sea Basin. This work gives a new perspective on the study of imperialism by focusing on the inter- and interaimperial relations in the Ottoman context, south-south dimension of colonialism in Africa and the Middle East, and the shift from “old” to “new” imperial models of rule along the empire’s frontiers-cum-borderlands at the turn of the 20th century.

My current research project focuses on the life and work an Ottoman officer and diplomat who lived in Istanbul but travelled extensively in Africa and Europe. Currently, I am writing on an annotated translation of one of his travelogues that he wrote on a journey to Addis Ababa, tentatively titled An Ottoman Officer and a Gentleman in East Africa. This is the first part in what I envision to be a three-part research project. The second part will be a contextualize biography, a sort of life and times of this Victorian Age Arab-Ottoman gentleman who lived in Istanbul, Damascus, Beirut, Sofia, Berlin and Hijaz and travelled extensively throughout Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The third will be an in-depth exploration of Ottoman-Ethiopian relations as the two empires faced looming European colonialism during the age of High Imperialism. It is tentatively titled; The Road from Addis Ababa to Jerusalem goes through Istanbul.

Keywords

Middle East, Near Eastern Studies, Ottoman Studies, Ottoman History, Transimperial History, World History, Colonialism, Imperialism, Diplomatic History, Social History, Biography, Micro-history, Internationalization, Refugees, African History, Sahara, Arabia, Mediterranean, Turkey, Turkish history, Istanbul, Libya. 

Departments/Programs

  • History
  • Jewish Studies Program

Graduate Fields

  • History
  • Near Eastern Studies

Research

My first book, The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and the Hijaz focuses on the empire’s efforts to reinvent itself on the international stage through the use of international law, interimperial diplomacy, and interpersonal relations with local chiefs, Sufi order leaders, kings, and sultans in Europe, the Sahara, and the Red Sea Basin. This work gives a new perspective on the study of imperialism by focusing on the inter- and interaimperial relations in the Ottoman context, south-south dimension of colonialism in Africa and the Middle East, and the shift from “old” to “new” imperial models of rule along the empire’s frontiers-cum-borderlands at the turn of the 20th century.

My current research project focuses on the life and work an Ottoman officer and diplomat who lived in Istanbul but travelled extensively in Africa and Europe. Currently, I am writing on an annotated translation of one of his travelogues that he wrote on a journey to Addis Ababa, tentatively titled An Ottoman Officer and a Gentleman in East Africa. This is the first part in what I envision to be a three-part research project. The second part will be a contextualize biography, a sort of life and times of this Victorian Age Arab-Ottoman gentleman who lived in Istanbul, Damascus, Beirut, Sofia, Berlin and Hijaz and travelled extensively throughout Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The third will be an in-depth exploration of Ottoman-Ethiopian relations as the two empires faced looming European colonialism during the age of High Imperialism. It is tentatively titled; The Road from Addis Ababa to Jerusalem goes through Istanbul. (less)

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