arrow grid linear view icon
The College of Arts Sciences Search

Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:
HIST 1511 : The Making of Modern Europe, from 1500 to the Present
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course surveys major developments since 1500, including the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Imperialism, Fascism and Communism, Word Wars I & II, the Cold War, decolonization, the welfare state  and the emergence of a "new world order." Prominent themes are the changing experience of violence, the relationship of Europe to the rest of the world, and the tensions within and among national, ethnic and "Western" identities. This course fulfills some of the traditional goals of a "great books" course through exposure to major thinkers like Luther, Hobbes, John  Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx, but it also introduces other kinds of historical sources, such as personal memoirs, parliamentary debates, and film.
View course details
Description
HIST 1540 : American Capitalism
Crosslisted as: AMST 1540, ILRLR 1845 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course studies the history of American capitalism. It helps you to answer these questions: What is capitalism? Is the U.S. more capitalist than other countries? How has capitalism shaped the history of the United States? Has it been a force for freedom, or is it a system of exploitation? What is its future? Through lectures, readings, and discussions, we'll give you the tools to win all your future arguments about capitalism, pro and con. And we won't even charge you the full market price.
View course details
Description
HIST 1561 : Introduction to the Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: NES 1561 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the study of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the late 13th century until the early part of 19th century. The classes will follow the main timeline of the geographical expansion of the empire with a special emphasis on the historical significance of the conquest of Istanbul, the consolidation of the borders of the empire, the establishment of the state apparatus in the classical period, a period of turbulence leading to a substantial transformation of the state in the early 19th century. Special focus will be placed on the Ottoman Empire's diverse religious communities—using the history of the Jewish community as the main case study—the evolution of the imperial and provincial governments' relationships with the various socio-cultural groups, legal and economic practices in the urban centers, the culture of the court in the early modern period, and the evolution of the inter-communal relations in the empire's urban centers.  This course is intended to provide the student with a solid foundation from which they can pursue further specialized study in the history of the Ottoman Empire, the Modern Middle East, and the Eastern Mediterranean.
View course details
Description
HIST 1575 : History Goes to Hollywood
Crosslisted as: AMST 1575 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
From the inception of the film industry, depictions of historical events have captured the attention of screen writers, directors and not the least audiences; often making deep impressions on a particular generation's common sense about events in the distant or recent past.   This class will examine some of the most influential historical films such as: A Foreign Affair, Spartacus, The Ten Commandments, Reds, Schindler's List, Apocalypse Now, Argo, Black Hawk Down, JFK and Selma.  Films will be available on Blackboard through streaming.  We will spend approximately two weeks on each film, reading historical essays on the period depicted as well as film and cultural analysis.  Classes will combine lecture format for historical framing and context with elements of flipped classroom.  Films will be viewed outside the classroom and in class we will view clips and discuss them in tandem with the readings.
View course details
Description
HIST 1640 : U.S. History since the Great Depression
Crosslisted as: AMST 1640 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introductory survey to United States history since the Great Depression, this course explores the dramatic social, economic, and political transformations of the last century. It emphasizes domestic political developments, particularly the evolving notions of government responsibility for various social problems. Therefore, the course is especially concerned with the interactions between the state, popular movements, and people's daily lives.
View course details
Description
HIST 1700 : History of Exploration: Land, Sea, and Space
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 1700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
From ancient seafarers to the Mars rovers, from Christopher Columbus to the Apollo astronauts, humans have for centuries explored the far reaches of our planet and are now venturing into the solar system and beyond. This course examines the history of such human activity. Among the topics covered are motives for exploration, technological advances that assist exploration, obstacles that must be overcome, the roles of leaders, the spread of information about exploration, and positive and negative consequences of exploration. It is led by Steven Squyres of Astronomy and Mary Beth Norton of History, with the assistance of guest lecturers.
View course details
Description
HIST 1930 : A Global History of Love
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1193, FGSS 1940, LGBT 1940 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
By posing seemingly simple questions such as what is love and who has the right to love, this introductory-level lecture course surveys how love has been experienced and expressed from the pre-modern period to the present. Through case studies of familial and conjugal love in Africa, Asia, the US, Europe, and South and Latin America, the course will examine the debates about and enactment's of what constitutes the appropriate way to show love and affection in different cultures and historical contexts. Among the themes we will explore are questions of sexuality, marriage, kinship, and gender rights. A final unit will examine these themes through modern technologies such as the Internet, scientific advances in medicine, and a growing awareness that who and how we love is anything but simple or universal.
View course details
Description
HIST 1942 : The History of Science in Europe: Newton to Darwin; Darwin to Einstein
Crosslisted as: BSOC 1942, STS 1942 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What is modern science? And how did it get that way? This course examines the emergence of the dominant scientific worldview inherited by the 21st century, to trace how it, and its associated institutional practices, became established in largely European settings and contexts from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. It focuses on those broad conceptions of the universe and human knowledge that shaped a wide variety of scientific disciplines, as well as considering the twin views of science as "natural philosophy" and as practical tool.
View course details
Description
HIST 1955 : No Gods, No Masters: Histories of Anarchism
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Anarchism. What is it good for? A political philosophy and approach to social organization that arose simultaneous with other grand "-isms," anarchism, perhaps more than any other idea and practice, has been condensed down by its critics and observers into a vague set of often contradictory caricatures. Is 'it' characterized by bohemian communities of nihilists, their rebellion culturally innovative but politically impotent, book-ended by Friedrich Nietzsche and Johnny Rotten; or is 'it' individualist libertarians who walk in the ideological footsteps of Ayn Rand and Milton Friedman rather than Mikhail Bakunin and Peter Kropotkin; or, most famously, is 'it' a murky underworld of conspiratorial bomb throwers, held together less by bonds of solidarity than by a commitment to violence? This course provides some relief from such limited and constraining perspectives by taking anarchism seriously as a lived tradition of direct, non-hierarchical democracy.
View course details
Description
HIST 2001 : Supervised Reading - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised reading with history faculty.  Student must complete Independent Study Form with faculty supervisor for determining requirements and for permission to enroll through the online system (https://data.arts/cornell.edu/as-stus/indep_study_intro.cfm).  Student then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
View course details
Description
HIST 2090 : The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692
Crosslisted as: AMST 2090, FGSS 2090 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692. Even though many books have been written about this endlessly fascinating episode in American history, numerous aspects of it remain unexplored. After reading some of the latest books and articles on the subject, as well as contemporary accounts of other New England witchcraft cases, students will focus on researching and writing their own original interpretations of some aspect of the 1692 crisis that interests them. The best papers in the course will have the opportunity to be "published" on the Cornell witchcraft collection website. (Some student papers from past years have been cited in recent Salem scholarship.)
View course details
Description
HIST 2163 : History of the United Nations
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A general history of the United Nations from its origins to the present. The course will deal with changes  in the missions and operations of all the major departments of the UN and its associated organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, but the emphasis will be on the crisis activities of the Security Council and peacekeeping activities in the field.
View course details
Description
HIST 2315 : The Occupation of Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2258 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In August 1945, Japan was a devastated country – its cities burned, its people starving, its military and government in surrender.  World War II was over.  The occupation had begun.  What sort of society emerged from the cooperation and conflict between occupiers and occupied?  Students will examine sources ranging from declassified government documents to excerpts from diaries and bawdy fiction, alongside major scholarly studies, to find out.  The first half of the course focuses on key issues in Japanese history, like the fate of the emperor, constitutional revision, and the emancipation of women.  The second half zooms out for a wider perspective, for the occupation of Japan was never merely a local event.  It was the collapse of Japanese empire and the rise of American empire in Asia.  It was decolonization in Korea and the start of the Cold War.  Students will further investigate these links in final individual research projects.
View course details
Description
HIST 2530 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2655, NES 2655, RELST 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The seventh-century Arab conquests resulted in the creation of a vibrant new civilization that stretched from the Iberian peninsula in the west to Central Asia and the borders of India in the east. We will follow the course of Islamic history from the birth of Muhammad until the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258, with special attention to the achievements of Muslims in the fields of law, theology, literature, science, philosophy, art and architecture.
View course details
Description
HIST 2541 : Modern Caribbean History
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2308, LATA 2308 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the development of the Caribbean since the Haitian Revolution.  It  will focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and our readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region.  The course uses a pan-Caribbean approach by focusing largely on three islands - Jamaica, Haiti and Cuba - that belonged to competing empires.  Although the imperial powers that held these nations shaped their histories in distinctive ways these nations share certain common features. Therefore, we examine the differences and similarities of their histories as they evolved from plantation based colonies to independent nations. 
View course details
Description
HIST 2630 : Histories of the Apocalypse: From Nostradamus to Nuclear Winter
Crosslisted as: RELST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Religious groups, political pundits, and filmmakers seem recently obsessed with envisioning the apocalypse, whether through a zombie onslaught or the second coming of Christ. Why are we so fascinated with the end of the world? What can apocalyptic visions tell us about the times we live in now, and how we lived in the past? How were they used to make claims about human nature and about who did and did not deserve salvation? This course traces obsessions with Armageddon from the 1500s until the present day, using novels, films, and other historical sources to answer these questions.
View course details
Description
HIST 2650 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2675 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
View course details
Description
HIST 2664 : What's Colonial About Early America?
Crosslisted as: AMST 2664 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Many Americans envision the colonial period as a relatively quaint and benign time dominated by Pocahontas, the Pilgrims, and provinciality.  Pairing the term "colonial" with "America" also tends to render the nearly-three centuries between Europeans' arrival in the western hemisphere and the Declaration of Independence as the prehistory of the United States when in fact multiple colonial regimes existed in North America at any time prior to 1776.  This course investigates the rich, complex, and violent history of early America with the objective of a fresh appreciation of its "colonial" aspects – natural resource extraction, territorial expropriation and displacement of indigenous peoples, exploitation of enslaved labor, and the imposition of juridical authority over "settled" spaces – with an eye toward a better understanding of the larger patterns of domination (however incomplete) in which the emergent international state system and global capitalism creating imbalances of wealth and power that persist to this day.  In addition to exploration of familiar sites like the thirteen Anglo-American colonies, the course will venture into less well-known areas (including those outside contemporary national American boundaries) to enhance students' appreciation of the diversity of human in experience in early America via comparative analysis.
View course details
Description
HIST 2674 : History of the Modern Middle East
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2674, GOVT 2747, NES 2674 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines major trends in the evolution of the Middle East in the modern era. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries and ending with the  "Arab Spring," we will consider Middle East history with an emphasis on five themes: imperialism, nationalism, modernization, Islam, and revolution.  Readings will be supplemented with translated primary sources, which will form the backbone of class discussions.
View course details
Description
HIST 2690 : History of Terrorism
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This lecture course examines approaches to the study of European terrorism. It will cover 1) the history of terrorism as it developed over the course of the modern era (in the process distinguishing terrorism from other forms of modern political violence, e.g. partisan warfare, state terror, etc.) and 2) the ways terrorism has been perceived, presented, and remembered by contemporaries and subsequent generations. Questions, therefore, will include the following: How has terrorism been approached by political theory, history, literature, etc.? How have these approaches constructed terrorism as an object of scientific investigation? How were terrorists perceived and represented by their contemporaries (in the press, literature, the arts)? How did terrorists represent themselves (in political pamphlets, autobiographies, fiction)? Readings will include archival materials, manifestos, memoirs, and novels, as well as classic pieces of political writing (e.g. Lenin, Schmitt, Arendt).
View course details
Description
HIST 2710 : Introduction to the History of Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2071, STS 2071 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an introductory survey of the history of medicine (principally in Europe and the United States) from classical antiquity to the early twentieth century. Using a combination of both primary and secondary sources, students will learn about the "Hippocratic Heritage" of contemporary western medicine; medicine in late antiquity; faith and healing in the medieval period; medicine and knowledge in the Islamic world; medicine during the Renaissance (particularly the rise of the mechanical philosophy); medicine in the age of Enlightenment; professionalization, women-doctors and midwives, and battles over 'quackery' in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the role of medicine in colonialism and empire; and the promises and perils of modern medicine (dramatic decreases in mortality on the one hand, the rise of Eugenics and the importance of Medicine to the National Socialist State on the other). As well as this temporal survey, we will consider a number of ongoing themes: race, bodily difference, and medicine; medicine and the environment; women, gender, and medicine; the history of the body; the history of sexuality; and the close connections between forms of social order and forms of medical knowledge. The course meets three times a week (for two lectures and a section) and is open to all.
View course details
Description
HIST 2726 : Culture and Identity in Modern America: The 19th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2726 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An examination of the development of cultural and intellectual diversity in the United States.  Topics covered include: slavery and abolition; landscape and environment; religion; Darwinism; professionalization; literature; and the women's movement.
View course details
Description
HIST 2860 : The French Revolution
Crosslisted as: FREN 2860 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In the turbulent and violent years from 1789 to 1815, France experienced virtually every form of government known to the modern world. This course explores the rapidly changing political landscape of this extraordinary period as well as the evolution of Revolutionary culture (the arts, theater, songs, fashion, the cult of the guillotine, attitudes towards gender and race). Whenever possible, we will use texts and images produced by the Revolutionaries themselves.
View course details
Description
HIST 2910 : Modern European Jewish History, 1789 - 1948
Crosslisted as: JWST 2920, NES 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
HIST 2920 : Inventing an Information Society
Crosslisted as: AMST 2980, ECE 2980, ENGRG 2980, INFO 2921, STS 2921 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Explores the history of information technology from the 1830s to the present by considering the technical and social history of telecommunications (telegraph and the telephone), radio, television, computers, and the Internet. Emphasis is on the changing relationship between science and technology, the economic aspects of innovation, gender and technology, and other social relations of this technology.
View course details
Description
HIST 3002 : Supervised Research - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised research with a history faculty member.  Student must complete an Independent Study form with a faculty supervisor to determine requirements and for permission.  Students then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
View course details
Description
HIST 3031 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 3032, ASRC 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries.
View course details
Description
HIST 3652 : African Economic Development Histories
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3652 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What impact did Africa's involvement in the slave trade and its colonization by Europe have on its long-term economic health? What role have post-independence political decisions made within Africa and by multinational economic actors (the World Bank and the IMF, for example) had on altering the trajectory of Africa's economic history? Does China's recent heavy investment in Africa portend a movement away from or a continuation of Africa's economic underdevelopment? These questions and others will be addressed in this course.
View course details
Description
HIST 3677 : The Search for the Historical Muhammad
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 3677, NES 3677, NES 6677, RELST 3677 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Unlike Moses or Jesus, Muhammad is said to have been born in the full light of history. The earliest extant biography of the Prophet, the Life of Muhammad by Ibn Hisham (d. 833), contains a full account of the Prophet's career, from his birth ca. 570 to his death in 632. In this seminar, we will read the Life of Muhammad and analyze selected episodes from a critical historical perspective, with attention to biblical and post-biblical literary models.
View course details
Description
HIST 3710 : World War II in Europe
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Second World War remains the single most important set of events shaping the contemporary world. The course deals with both the events of World War II as they shaped European and world history and the way those events were remembered and commemorated in postwar years. Lectures, screenings, and readings will examine: the role of wartime political leaders and military commanders; the experience of war and occupation for soldiers and civilians, including Resistance movements and collaborators; Nazi genocide; intellectual and cultural changes during the war, including the impact on literature and philosophy; strategic questions about the origins and conduct of the war; the concluding phases involving the Nuremberg Trials, the Yalta and Potsdam conferences, and the launching of the Cold War; and the representation of the war in subsequent films, literature, and political culture.
View course details
Description
HIST 3870 : The History of Consumption: From Wedgwood to Wal-Mart
Crosslisted as: AMST 3870, ILRLR 3870 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Whether buying at a general store, shopping at a department store, or loitering at a mall, consumption has always formed an important part of the American experience. More than just commodities bought and sold, consumption is also about the institutions, social practices, cultural meanings, and economic functions that have surrounded the merchandise. This course will look at the changing meanings consumption has had for life, politics, and economy in the US over the past 300 years.
View course details
Description
HIST 3950 : Monsoon Kingdoms: Pre-Modern Southeast Asian History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3397, ASIAN 6697, HIST 6950 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Southeast Asia's history from earliest times up until the mid-eighteenth century. The genesis of traditional kingdoms, the role of monumental architecture (such as Angkor in Cambodia and Borobodur in Indonesia), and the forging of maritime trade links across the region are all covered. Religion - both indigenous to Southeast Asia and the great imports of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam - are also surveyed in the various premodern polities that dotted Southeast Asia. This course questions the region's early connections with China, India, and Arabia, and asks what is indigenous about Southeast Asian history, and what has been borrowed over the centuries. Open to undergraduates, both majors and non-majors in History, and to graduate students, though with separate requirements.
View course details
Description
HIST 4000 : Introduction to Historical Research
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar is an introduction to the theory, practice, and art of historical research and writing. One key purpose of this course is to prepare students to work on longer research projects—especially an Honors Thesis. We will analyze the relationship between evidence and argument in historical writing; assess the methods and possible biases in various examples of historical writing; identify debates and sources relevant to research problems; think about how to use sources creatively; and discuss the various methodological issues associated with historical inquiry, analysis, and presentation.
View course details
Description
HIST 4001 : Honors Guidance
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides structure for the student's research and introduces them to research techniques. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the History Department's Honors Program.
View course details
Description
HIST 4091 : Contesting Identities in Modern Egypt
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4650, NES 4605 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines the dynamics of modern collective identities which dominated the Egyptian public sphere in the long twentieth century. We will explore the underpinnings and formation of territorial Egyptian nationalism, pan-Arabism and Islamism through close readings and class discussions of important theoretical, historiographical and primary texts.
View course details
Description
HIST 4122 : Darwin and the Making of Histories
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4122, STS 4122 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The power of a name is sometimes as great as that of an idea.  This course will study how Darwin became, then and now, an icon rather than just a Victorian naturalist.  We will look at writings of Darwin himself, especially On the Origin of Species (1859), Descent of Man (1871), and his short autobiography, and attempt to understand what they meant in their own time, how Darwin came to write them, and how his contemporaries helped to shape their future.  How did Victorian ideologies of gender, race, and class shape the production and reception of Darwin's work?  We will also examine the growth of "Darwinism" as a set of broader social and cultural movements, particularly in Britain and the United States.  Were eugenics movements examples or perversions of Darwinism?  Finally, we will consider how Darwin's name has been used by more recent evolutionary biologists and by American anti-evolutionists.
View course details
Description
HIST 4127 : Sex, Science, and Revolution in Asia, 1500-2000
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, FGSS 4127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption have preoccupied ruler and ruled alike in Asia, and prompted campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, explores the links between sexual, political, and scientific revolutions in Asia from the 1500s to the present.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, the history of masculinity, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, honorific violence, body modification, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  We first explore the body in "traditional" Asian cultures, legal regimes, and medical practice.  We then explore the modernization of sex, health, and the body itself under the major rival political movements in Asia: imperialism, nationalism, communism, and feminism.
View course details
Description
HIST 4202 : The Politics of Inequality: The History of the U.S. Welfare State
Crosslisted as: AMST 4202 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This research seminar explores how Americans and their elected leaders struggled to respond to economic and social inequality throughout the twentieth century. It traces the expansions and retractions of the U.S. welfare state with special attention to the influence of average people's organizing and activism. Among other things, students will study the Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, the "Reagan Revolution," and Clinton's welfare reforms. Assessment will be on the basis of class discussion, weekly reading responses, and a substantial research paper based in primary sources.
View course details
Description
HIST 4345 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, CLASS 7679, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
View course details
Description
HIST 4393 : The Underground Railroad and the Coming of the Civil War
Crosslisted as: AMST 4393, ASRC 4393, HIST 6393 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In 1850 American politicians banded together cross-regionally, passed a Fugitive Slave Law and breathed a sigh of relief, thinking they had once again dodged the slavery issue that threatened disunion. This "Bloodhound Bill" was designed to make "slave" catchers of all Northern whites. Instead it set in motion waves of protests, transformed previously silent whites into underground conductors, further emboldened veteran underground workers and forced thousands of self emancipated Northern blacks to emigrate. The Underground Railroad contributed to convincing Southerners that the Government would not or could not protect slavery. This course examines underground activism beginning in 1850 and offers an interpretation of how the Underground Railroad led to emancipation. The ebbs and flows of underground activity; transnational networks; Civil War military and geo-political issues; and what W.E.B. DuBois called the "General Strike" all contributed to making the Thirteenth Amendment a foregone conclusion.
View course details
Description
HIST 4547 : The Middle East in Africa, Africa in the Middle East
Crosslisted as: HIST 6547, NES 4547, NES 6547 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar we will explore the Ottoman Empire's presence in the continent, and the continent's influence on the rest of the Ottoman Empire.  In addition to the focus on the history of Ottoman North Africa, we will explore the role Istanbul played in the history of the Red Sea Basin (today's Somalia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia) and vice versa. A special focus will be placed on the role sub-Saharan African slave trade played in Ottoman society, from the ruling elite households of Istanbul to the day-to-day formulation of ideas of difference making across the Turkish and Arabic speaking parts of the Ottoman Empire. Emphasis will be placed on reading new literature on race and slavery in the Ottoman world, borrowing theoretical and analytical formulations around this topic form better-developed historiographies of other parts of the world. This seminar targets a senior and graduate students interested in the history of empire, the Middle East and Africa trans-imperial histories, and south-south relations. 
View course details
Description
HIST 6127 : Sex, Science, and Statecraft in Early Modern and Modern Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, FGSS 4127, HIST 4127 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
HIST 6221 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: STS 6121 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This graduate seminar offers an introduction to environmental history—the study of human interactions with nonhuman nature in the past. It is a subfield within the historical discipline that has complex roots, an interdisciplinary orientation, and synergies with fields across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. This seminar explores environmental history on three levels: historically, historiographically, and theoretically. What are some of the key historical processes that have shaped humans' historical relationships with the environment at various scales? How have environmental historians (re)conceptualized the field as it has developed over the past half-century? What analytic concepts have environmental historians used to understand human-natural relations? Select themes include ecological imperialism, labor and work, body/environment, global environmental history, "mainstreaming" environmental history, and the Anthropocene.
View course details
Description
HIST 6345 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, CLASS 7679, HIST 4345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
View course details
Description
HIST 6393 : The Underground Railroad and the Coming of the Civil War
Crosslisted as: AMST 4393, ASRC 4393, HIST 4393 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In 1850 American politicians banded together cross-regionally, passed a Fugitive Slave Law and breathed a sigh of relief, thinking they had once again dodged the slavery issue that threatened disunion. This "Bloodhound Bill" was designed to make "slave" catchers of all Northern whites. Instead it set in motion waves of protests, transformed previously silent whites into underground conductors, further emboldened veteran underground workers and forced thousands of self emancipated Northern blacks to emigrate. The Underground Railroad contributed to convincing Southerners that the Government would not or could not protect slavery. This course examines underground activism beginning in 1850 and offers an interpretation of how the Underground Railroad led to emancipation. The ebbs and flows of underground activity; transnational networks; Civil War military and geo-political issues; and what W.E.B. DuBois called the "General Strike" all contributed to making the Thirteenth Amendment a foregone conclusion.
View course details
Description
HIST 6481 : Topics in Latin American History
Crosslisted as: LATA 6481 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is a readings and research seminar on the history of Spanish America from roughly 1750 to 2000, with particular attention to the post-independence histories of peasants, urban workers, and intellectuals. Weekly readings will include a major monograph on Latin America and particular theme (idea of peasant community; gender and labor; immigration and the social question; rise of the middle classes; politics of memory; the Left, among others) plus additional theoretical articles from various disciplines and fields that complement or challenge authors' conceptualizations of their material. As well as weekly participation and presentations, students will be expected to research and write a 25-30 page research paper based on primary sources. Reading knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not required.
View course details
Description
HIST 6547 : The Middle East in Africa, Africa in the Middle East
Crosslisted as: HIST 4547, NES 4547, NES 6547 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar we will explore the Ottoman Empire's presence in the continent, and the continent's influence on the rest of the Ottoman Empire.  In addition to the focus on the history of Ottoman North Africa, we will explore the role Istanbul played in the history of the Red Sea Basin (today's Somalia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia) and vice versa. A special focus will be placed on the role sub-Saharan African slave trade played in Ottoman society, from the ruling elite households of Istanbul to the day-to-day formulation of ideas of difference making across the Turkish and Arabic speaking parts of the Ottoman Empire. Emphasis will be placed on reading new literature on race and slavery in the Ottoman world, borrowing theoretical and analytical formulations around this topic form better-developed historiographies of other parts of the world. This seminar targets a senior and graduate students interested in the history of empire, the Middle East and Africa trans-imperial histories, and south-south relations. 
View course details
Description
HIST 6950 : Monsoon Kingdoms: Pre-Modern Southeast Asian History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3397, ASIAN 6697, HIST 3950 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Southeast Asia's history from earliest times up until the mid-eighteenth century. The genesis of traditional kingdoms, the role of monumental architecture (such as Angkor in Cambodia and Borobodur in Indonesia), and the forging of maritime trade links across the region are all covered. Religion - both indigenous to Southeast Asia and the great imports of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam - are also surveyed in the various premodern polities that dotted Southeast Asia. This course questions the region's early connections with China, India, and Arabia, and asks what is indigenous about Southeast Asian history, and what has been borrowed over the centuries. Open to undergraduates, both majors and non-majors in History, and to graduate students, though with separate requirements.
View course details
Description
HIST 7090 : Introduction to the Graduate Study of History
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed to introduce entering graduate students to crucial issues and problems in historical methodology that cut across various areas of specialization.
View course details
Description