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HIST 1180 :
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
HIST 1200 : FWS: Writing History
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How can we learn about the past? How do we tell stories about the past? How do we judge the truth of falsity of evidence? Writing History seminars introduce students to many different ways of interpreting and writing about the past, and to the wide range of sources that historians use: from diaries to tax rolls, from scraps of textile to films and advertisements. Topics and readings vary by section.
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HIST 1200 : FWS: Writing History
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How can we learn about the past? How do we tell stories about the past? How do we judge the truth of falsity of evidence? Writing History seminars introduce students to many different ways of interpreting and writing about the past, and to the wide range of sources that historians use: from diaries to tax rolls, from scraps of textile to films and advertisements. Topics and readings vary by section.
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HIST 1321 : FWS: Post-World War II America: Crisis and Continuity
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why are the years following World War II considered so remarkable in the landscape of American history? Several critical events and debates that rocked the nation from the 1940s onward reverberate today, such as involvement in wars, civil rights, women's rights, concerns about teenagers, and crises in American cities. Enriched by a variety of primary sources, including films and TV shows, this course analyzes the central events, people, and forces that transformed American society and culture from the years after World War II to the present. The course aims to help students learn how to write persuasively about scholarship and primary sources, while gaining a deeper appreciation for the lasting influence of the major events, crises, and interpretations of post-World War II American history.
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HIST 1402 : FWS: Global Islam
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course looks at Islam as a global phenomenon, both historically and in the contemporary world.  We spend time on the genesis of Islam in the Middle East, but then move across the Muslim would in various weeks (to Africa;Turkey; Iran; Eurasia; Southeast Asia; East Asia) and to the West to see how Islam looks across global boundaries.  The course tries to flesh out the diversity of Islam within the central message of this world religion.
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HIST 1431 : FWS: Mao, China, and the World
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Mao Zedong's famous portrait hangs over the entrance to the Forbidden City in Beijing, a fitting symbol of his dominating presence in the history of modern China. But who exactly was Mao and how has he been perceived by others? A courageous revolutionary seeking the liberation of the oppressed masses? A bloodthirsty tyrant bent on self-exaltation and personal power? A savvy politician promoting the modernization of an ancient land? In this course we will probe the figure of Mao through a variety of readings, some by Mao, but most by others, ranging from Mao's physician to former Red Guards to Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. And we will add our own perceptions to them by writing about Mao, the man and the myth.
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HIST 1445 : FWS: Brazilian Modernism through Literature, Art, Architecture, and Popular Music
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course looks at how Brazilian intellectuals came to terms with their present and imagined their future throughout the 20th century. From São Paulo's week of Modern Art in 1922 through the construction of Brasília in 1960 and into the musical movement known as Tropicália, Brazilians have sought to define themselves as both modern and tropical. This seminar will explore how they did so, familiarizing students with the history of Brazil through the lens of literature, art, architecture, and music. It will provide tools to think critically about different regions in Brazil, the social and aesthetic contexts for the emergence of artistic vanguards, and the complicated relationships that Brazilian intellectuals have had with the United States and Western Europe.
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HIST 1460 : FWS: Papers of Empire: Writing and the Colonization of America from Columbus to Lewis and Clark
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When Christopher Columbus left what Europeans believed to be the known world in 1492 in quest of empire his decision to keep a journal established a critical link between writing and the colonization of the "New World."  For the next three centuries Europeans strove to establish and maintain authority over peoples and territories via networks of information that flowed back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean (and later, the continental United States) in bundles of paper.  This course examines the relationship between writing (considered broadly to include journals, letters, diaries, books, reports, maps, and drawings), and European nations' expropriation of millions of prior inhabitants of the western hemisphere.  How did Europeans, and later, Americans use writing to facilitate the process of conquest?
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HIST 1511 : The Making of Modern Europe, from 1500 to the Present
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How do we make sense of the Brexit vote in Great-Britain, the rise of political Islam and the "veil" debates in France, the anti-globalization movements in Spain and Greece, the growth of demagogic anti-immigrant parties from the Netherlands to Italy, or the fact that Swedes get more than thirty paid days off per year?  This course seeks to answer these questions by exploring the history of modern Europe.  Among other themes, we will discuss the Protestant Reformation, the rise of absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialism, colonialism, the Russian Revolution, the two world wars, decolonization and immigration, May '68, and the construction of the European Union.  In conjunction, we will examine how modern ideologies (liberalism, Marxism, imperialism, conservatism, fascism, totalitarianism) were developed and challenged.  Through a wide array of historical documents (fiction, letters, philosophy, treatises, manifestoes, films, and art), we will consider why "old Europe" is still relevant for us today.
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HIST 1540 : American Capitalism
Crosslisted as: AMST 1540, ILRLR 1845 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course studies the history of American capitalism. It helps you to answer these questions: What is capitalism? Is the U.S. more capitalist than other countries? How has capitalism shaped the history of the United States? Has it been a force for freedom, or is it a system of exploitation? What is its future? Through lectures, readings, and discussions, we'll give you the tools to win all your future arguments about capitalism, pro and con. And we won't even charge you the full market price.
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HIST 1561 : Introduction to the Ottoman Empire
Crosslisted as: NES 1561 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to the study of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the late 13th century until the early part of 19th century. The classes will follow the main timeline of the geographical expansion of the empire with a special emphasis on the historical significance of the conquest of Istanbul, the consolidation of the borders of the empire, the establishment of the state apparatus in the classical period, a period of turbulence leading to a substantial transformation of the state in the early 19th century. Special focus will be placed on the Ottoman Empire's diverse religious communities—using the history of the Jewish community as the main case study—the evolution of the imperial and provincial governments' relationships with the various socio-cultural groups, legal and economic practices in the urban centers, the culture of the court in the early modern period, and the evolution of the inter-communal relations in the empire's urban centers.  This course is intended to provide the student with a solid foundation from which they can pursue further specialized study in the history of the Ottoman Empire, the Modern Middle East, and the Eastern Mediterranean.
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HIST 1575 : History Goes to Hollywood
Crosslisted as: AMST 1575 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
From the inception of the film industry, depictions of historical events have captured the attention of screen writers, directors and not the least audiences; often making deep impressions on a particular generation's common sense about events in the distant or recent past.   This class will examine some of the most influential historical films such as: A Foreign Affair, Spartacus, The Ten Commandments, Reds, Schindler's List, Apocalypse Now, Argo, Black Hawk Down, JFK and Selma.  Films will be available on Blackboard through streaming.  We will spend approximately two weeks on each film, reading historical essays on the period depicted as well as film and cultural analysis.  Classes will combine lecture format for historical framing and context with elements of flipped classroom.  Films will be viewed outside the classroom and in class we will view clips and discuss them in tandem with the readings.
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HIST 1585 : Sports and Politics in American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 1585 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between sports and politics over the course of American history since the 19th century.  Sports and politics have come together surprisingly frequently in the last two centuries and this course will take a "case study" method to examine particular episodes of politicized sports.  In the course of our investigations, we will the following questions: How do we define politics?  How have sports acted as a place for subversion and resistance? Conversely, how have sports reflected the power structure? No background knowledge is necessary.   Course materials will include memoirs, articles, and a variety of visual sources, including film and photography.   Course requirements will include a research paper.
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HIST 1620 : Histories of the Future
Crosslisted as: STS 1102 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Frankenstein to The Matrix, science fiction and film have depicted contemporary science, technology, and medicine for almost two centuries. This course introduces students to historical and social studies of science and technology using science-fiction films and novels, as well as key readings in science and technology studies. What social questions can fictional accounts raise that factual ones can only anticipate? How have "intelligent machines" from Babbage's Analytical Engine to Hal raised questions about what it means to be human? What can Marvel Comics teach us about changes in science and technology? When can robots be women and, in general, what roles did gender play in scientific, technological, and medical stories? How was the discovery that one could look inside the human body received? How do dreams and nightmares of the future emerge from the everyday work of scientific and technological research?
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HIST 1622 : The World of Modern Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2222, CAPS 1622 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1868, samurai revolutionaries and their allies seized the reins of power and established a new capital they called Tokyo.  Against all odds, this fragile regime survived and made Tokyo a center of power that would transform both Japan and the world.  This survey of Japanese history explores the rise and fall of Japan as a modern imperial power; its foreign relations; its economic and scientific development from "feudalism" to futuristic technologies; and Japan's many modern revolutions, from the rule of the samurai to Westernization and democracy, from democratic collapse to fascism and World War II, and from Japan's postwar rebirth to the present.  We will examine not only big events but also everyday life, including gender and sexuality, family and schools, and art and popular culture.
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HIST 1660 : The Vikings and their World
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 1660, NES 1660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Globalisation may seem like a recent hot topic, but it was already very much in vogue 1000 years ago when Norse explorers burst out of Scandinavia to journey as far as North America, Azerbaijan, the Mediterranean and the White Sea. This course will introduce students to the Norsemen and women of the Viking Age and the centuries following it, weaving together literary, chronicle, archaeological and other sources to tell the remarkable stories of these medieval entrepreneurs and of the many people and places they encountered. Along the way, students will also pick up crucial historical thinking skills: assessing change and continuity over time, learning the basics of source criticism, and gaining an appreciation for interdisciplinary research. This course qualifies for credit towards the undergraduate minor in Viking Studies. 
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HIST 1700 : History of Exploration: Land, Sea, and Space
Crosslisted as: ASTRO 1700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
From ancient seafarers to the Mars rovers, from Christopher Columbus to the Apollo astronauts, humans have for centuries explored the far reaches of our planet and are now venturing into the solar system and beyond. This course examines the history of such human activity. Among the topics covered are motives for exploration, technological advances that assist exploration, obstacles that must be overcome, the roles of leaders, the spread of information about exploration, and positive and negative consequences of exploration. It is led by Steven Squyres of Astronomy and Mary Beth Norton of History, with the assistance of guest lecturers.
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HIST 1885 : Consumer Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 1885 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine consumerism in the United States, first focusing on the rise of advertising, mass market goods, shop windows, and department stores at the turn of the 20th century. We will examine the built environment and experience of shopping and the consequent disease of "kleptomania," or shoplifting, looking at inequality and activism as potential political outlet for consumerism. We will also ask study consumerism as a system. What stands outside consumer culture? Are the most precious, protected parts of our daily lives actually the most commercialized: nature, love, the gift, the family? What does it mean to commodify love or bottle nature? Can art or beauty be beyond value? This class moves beyond a discussion of Nikes and fast cars, asking for a wholesale revision of what can't be bought: Is it nature, family, love, art?
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HIST 1930 : A Global History of Love
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1193, FGSS 1940, LGBT 1940 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
By posing seemingly simple questions such as what is love and who has the right to love, this introductory-level lecture course surveys how love has been experienced and expressed from the pre-modern period to the present. Through case studies of familial and conjugal love in Africa, Asia, the US, Europe, and South and Latin America, the course will examine the debates about and enactment's of what constitutes the appropriate way to show love and affection in different cultures and historical contexts. Among the themes we will explore are questions of sexuality, marriage, kinship, and gender rights. A final unit will examine these themes through modern technologies such as the Internet, scientific advances in medicine, and a growing awareness that who and how we love is anything but simple or universal.
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HIST 1942 : The History of Science in Europe: Newton to Darwin; Darwin to Einstein
Crosslisted as: BSOC 1942, STS 1942 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What is modern science? And how did it get that way? This course examines the emergence of the dominant scientific worldview inherited by the 21st century, to trace how it, and its associated institutional practices, became established in largely European settings and contexts from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. It focuses on those broad conceptions of the universe and human knowledge that shaped a wide variety of scientific disciplines, as well as considering the twin views of science as "natural philosophy" and as practical tool. 
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HIST 1950 : The Invention of the Americas
Crosslisted as: LATA 1950 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
When did the 'Americas' come in to being?  Who created 'them' and how? What other geographic units of analysis might we consider in thinking about what Iberian explorers and intellectuals initially called the 'fourth part' of the world?  Given the scope and extent of the Spanish and Portuguese empires, could 'the Americas' extend from the Caribbean to the Philippines?  This course takes up such questions as a means to explore the history of what would become-only in the nineteenth century-'Latin America.' We move from the initial "encounters" of peoples from Africa and Iberia with the "New World," the creation of long-distance trade with, and settlement in, Asia, and the establishment of colonial societies, through to the movements for independence in most of mainland Spanish America in the early 19th century and to the collapse of Spanish rule in the Pacific and Caribbean later that century. Through lectures, discussions and the reading of primary sources and secondary texts, the course examines the economic and social organization of the colonies, intellectual currents and colonial science, native accommodation and resistance to colonial rule, trade networks and imperial expansion, labor regimes and forms of economic production, and migration and movement.
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HIST 1951 : Foreign Policy as Subversion
Crosslisted as: AMST 1951, LATA 1951 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To what extent does the ideal of the US as a vanguard for democracy and freedom in the world match up with other aspects—military, economic, and humanitarian—of US foreign policy? This same question about the degree to which discourses and practices correspond might be asked of other countries, like the Soviet Union, China, and Britain, but this course examines the ways in which US foreign policy has been deployed over the course of the twentieth century and the ways those policies have been perceived and received by people living in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Particular case studies will be addressed stemming from the faculty's specializations (for example, Vietnam, Cambodia, Guatemala, and Chile) and the emphasis is on the role of the United States in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Prominent themes will include forms of subversion, from military muscle to economic coercion, and how and why they have changed over time; meanings of liberty, democracy, freedom, and sovereignty in different places and times; popular responses to policies and actions of foreign administrations; the relationships between sovereign states and transnational corporations; the uses and abuses of History in the formulation and justification of policy initiatives and in local responses to them; and the complexities involved in discerning internal and external forces in an increasingly transnational world.
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HIST 1955 : No Gods, No Masters: Histories of Anarchism
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Anarchism. What is it good for? A political philosophy and approach to social organization that arose simultaneous with other grand "-isms," anarchism, perhaps more than any other idea and practice, has been condensed down by its critics and observers into a vague set of often contradictory caricatures. Is 'it' characterized by bohemian communities of nihilists, their rebellion culturally innovative but politically impotent, book-ended by Friedrich Nietzsche and Johnny Rotten; or is 'it' individualist libertarians who walk in the ideological footsteps of Ayn Rand and Milton Friedman rather than Mikhail Bakunin and Peter Kropotkin; or, most famously, is 'it' a murky underworld of conspiratorial bomb throwers, held together less by bonds of solidarity than by a commitment to violence? This course provides some relief from such limited and constraining perspectives by taking anarchism seriously as a lived tradition of direct, non-hierarchical democracy.
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HIST 2001 : Supervised Reading - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised reading with history faculty.  Student must complete Independent Study Form with faculty supervisor for determining requirements and for permission to enroll through the online system (https://data.arts/cornell.edu/as-stus/indep_study_intro.cfm).  Student then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 2001 : Supervised Reading - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised reading with history faculty.  Student must complete Independent Study Form with faculty supervisor for determining requirements and for permission to enroll through the online system (https://data.arts/cornell.edu/as-stus/indep_study_intro.cfm).  Student then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 2005 : The First American University
Crosslisted as: AMST 2001, ENGL 2999 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Educational historian Frederick Rudolph called Cornell University "the first American university," referring to its unique role as a coeducational, nonsectarian, land-grant institution with a broad curriculum and diverse student body. In this course, we will explore the history of Cornell, taking as our focus the pledge of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White to found a university where "any person can find instruction in any study." The course will cover a wide range of topics and perspectives relating to the faculty, student body, evolution of campus, and important events and eras in Cornell history. Stories and vignettes will provide background on the current university and its administrative structure, campus traditions, and the names that adorn buildings and memorials throughout campus. Finally, the course will offer a forum for students to address questions on present-day aspects of the university.
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HIST 2090 : The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692
Crosslisted as: AMST 2090, FGSS 2090 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692. Even though many books have been written about this endlessly fascinating episode in American history, numerous aspects of it remain unexplored. After reading some of the latest books and articles on the subject, as well as contemporary accounts of other New England witchcraft cases, students will focus on researching and writing their own original interpretations of some aspect of the 1692 crisis that interests them. The best papers in the course will have the opportunity to be "published" on the Cornell witchcraft collection website. (Some student papers from past years have been cited in recent Salem scholarship.) 
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HIST 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: AMST 2112, ASRC 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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HIST 2145 : Food in America
Crosslisted as: AMST 2145 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the history and culture of food in the United States over the last hundred years. Looking closely at contemporary food culture, we will ask questions such as: What are the origins of convenience foods? Who were America's most influential cooks? What is American cuisine?  What is the cultural meaning of a "proper" diet? Thematically organized, course topics include food and technology, food art, labor and tipping practices, food activism, consumerism, taste and eating behavior, fusion cuisine, and the celebrity chef. Creative assignments include a writing a restaurant review, conducting a food observation and interview, and innovating a new food invention.
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HIST 2163 : History of the United Nations
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A general history of the United Nations from its origins to the present. The course will deal with changes  in the missions and operations of all the major departments of the UN and its associated organizations such as the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, but the emphasis will be on the crisis activities of the Security Council and peacekeeping activities in the field. 
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HIST 2180 : Seminar on Genocide
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines some of the most terrible events of the twentieth century, events such as the mass murders of the Armenians (1915-1918), the European Jews (1939-1945), the Cambodians (1975-79), and the Tutsis of Rwanda (1994). Students will apply historical methods to address such questions as the preconditions leading to genocide; the relation of genocide to war, revolution, nation-building, and ideology; the motivations of perpetrators; the limits to victim's efforts at self-defense; the responses of the regional or world community; and the legal and political consequences of such acts.
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HIST 2220 : From the New Deal to the Age of Reagan
Crosslisted as: AMST 2220 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will explore some of the major political and cultural trends in the United States,  from the era of the Democratic New Dealer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, through the era of the conservative Republican, Ronald Reagan? This seminar will explore through primary source research and secondary readings  the key economic, political, and cultural characteristics and transformations of the period from 1930 though the turn of the century.  The course will examine the rise, persistence, and breakdown of the so-called "New Deal Order" and the crucial political shifts that we call the "Reagan Revolution." A key theme in this course will be the transformations and critiques of American liberalism and conservatism.
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HIST 2315 : The Occupation of Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2258 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In August 1945, Japan was a devastated country – its cities burned, its people starving, its military and government in surrender.  World War II was over.  The occupation had begun.  What sort of society emerged from the cooperation and conflict between occupiers and occupied?  Students will examine sources ranging from declassified government documents to excerpts from diaries and bawdy fiction, alongside major scholarly studies, to find out.  The first half of the course focuses on key issues in Japanese history, like the fate of the emperor, constitutional revision, and the emancipation of women.  The second half zooms out for a wider perspective, for the occupation of Japan was never merely a local event.  It was the collapse of Japanese empire and the rise of American empire in Asia.  It was decolonization in Korea and the start of the Cold War.  Students will further investigate these links in final individual research projects. 
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HIST 2321 : Introduction to Military History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2687 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to basic themes of military history, e.g., battle, strategy, tactics, war and society, as well as classic works, e.g. Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Jomini.  Recent theories in scholarship will also be emphasized.
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HIST 2452 : Dress Cloth and Identity
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2452 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to examine the importance of textiles in African social and economic history. It combines art history, anthropology, social and economic history to explore the role of textiles in marking status, gender, political authority and ethnicity. In addition, we examine the production and distribution of indigenous cloth and the consequences of colonial rule on African textile industries. Our analysis also considers the principles of African dress and clothing that shaped the African diaspora in the Americas as well as the more recent popularity and use of African fabrics and dress in the United States.
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HIST 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2512, ASRC 2512, FGSS 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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HIST 2530 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2655, NES 2655, RELST 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
At the beginning of the 7th century, a new religion, Islam, appeared in Arabia and by the end of the century, Muslims had defeated the Byzantines and Persians and created an empire that stretched from Spain to India. For the next millennium, Islam glittered. Its caliphs, courts, and capitals were grander, more powerful, and more sophisticated than those of any medieval king, duke or prince. In this course, we will trace the emergence and development of Islamic civilization from the birth of Muhammad ca. 570 to the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. We will read the Qur'an and listen to its recitation; examine the career of the Prophet Muhammad; follow the course of the Arab conquests; explore the nature of the conflict between Sunnis and Shi'is; learn about the five pillars of Islam, sharia law, theology, and Sufism; and assess the achievements of Muslim intellectuals in literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy. Friday sections are devoted to the analysis of primary sources in English translation. No previous knowledge required.
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HIST 2542 : The Making of Contemporary Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2542 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Most people learn about Africa through the media.  However, media critics note that coverage is disproportionately skewed toward negative stories - poverty, war and corruption. While these factors are a reality for too many people on the continent, media observers note that too often the coverage lacks context and breadth.  Furthermore, media outlets do not report positive developments even where they exist.  This course will provide some of the depth and context necessary to understand events in contemporary Africa.  The first two-thirds of the course will examine African social and economic history since the nineteenth century - Africa's integration in the international economy, the rise of new social classes, the creation of the colonial state and the post-colonial state.  Our primary examples will be drawn from  East, West and Southern Africa to highlight both the similarities and differences of their historical development.  The final third of the course will examine several contemporary issues in which scholars and journalists have attempted to address the weaknesses in general press coverage. 
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HIST 2560 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2680 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
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HIST 2562 : Medicine and Healing in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2262, BSOC 2561, CAPS 2262, STS 2561 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An exploration of processes of change in health care practices in China. Focuses on key transitions, such as the emergence of canonical medicine, of Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, of "scholar physicians," and of "traditional Chinese medicine" in modern China.  Inquiries into the development of healing practices in relation to both popular and specialist views of the body and disease; health care as organized by individuals, families, communities, and states; the transmission of medical knowledge; and healer-patient relations. Course readings include primary texts in translation as well as secondary materials. 
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HIST 2581 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: AMST 2581, BSOC 2581 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course serves as an introduction to the historical study of humanity's interrelationship with the natural world. Environmental history is a quickly evolving field, taking on increasing importance as the environment itself becomes increasingly important in world affairs. During this semester, we'll examine the sometimes unexpected ways in which "natural" forces have shaped human history (the role of germs, for instance, in the colonization of North America); the ways in which human beings have shaped the natural world (through agriculture, urbanization, and industrialization, as well as the formation of things like wildlife preserves); and the ways in which cultural, scientific, political, and philosophical attitudes toward the environment have changed over time. This is designed as an intensely interdisciplinary course: we'll view history through the lenses of ecology, literature, art, film, law, anthropology, and geography. Our focus will be on the United States, but, just as environmental pollutants cross borders, so too will this class, especially toward the end, when we attempt to put U.S. environmental history into a geopolitical context. This course is meant to be open to all, including non-majors and first-year students.
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HIST 2607 : Islam and Politics: Between an Islamic State and Daily Life
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2807, NES 2607, RELST 2617 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In the early twentieth century, a series of movements arose in the Middle East and South Asia, calling Muslims to return to Islam. Today, leaders and members of such groups –now known as Islamists –insist that one cannot live a fully Islamic life in the absence of an Islamic state. How and why did these movements come to focus on building an Islamic state? When did Islam come to be seen as indivisible from Politics, and what does it mean for Islam and Politics to be related? Are contemporary claims to Islam as the basis for political action consistent with the ways in which Muslims have understood their core texts historically? This course will introduce students to the study of Religion and Politics in Islamic History, beginning with the early Islamic community under the rule of the Prophet Muhammad, stretching through a period of rule that saw multiple Islamic Caliphates, and finally, reaching the present day. The bulk of this course, however, will focus on the diverse ways in which Muslims in the twentieth and twenty first centuries have laid claim to their religion as a template for political and social action. In particular, it will push students to consider how Muslim men and women live religion in their daily lives, whether through dress, prayer, or facial hair, and how these claims to religion shape political systems from the ground up.
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HIST 2630 : Histories of the Apocalypse: From Nostradamus to Nuclear Winter
Crosslisted as: RELST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Brexit, immigration, and the election of Donald Trump have all been recently heralded as signs of an imminent apocalypse. Films and fiction are saturated with images of zombies, environmental catastrophe, or nuclear disaster. Why are we so fascinated with the end of the world, and what is the genealogy of this imagery? What can visions of Armageddon tell us about past societal hopes and anxieties? How were they used to make claims about human nature and about who did and did not deserve salvation? This course traces apocalyptic thought from the Protestant reformation onwards, with a particular emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. Case studies range from radical millenarian sects to Chernobyl, and readings include all from Dostoevsky to Czech New Wave cinema. 
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HIST 2650 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2675 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
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HIST 2660 : Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong: Unlearning Native American History
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2660, AMST 2660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
One thing many Americans think they know is their Indians: Pocahontas, the First Thanksgiving, fighting cowboys, reservation poverty, and casino riches. Under our very noses, however, Native American history has evolved into one of the most exciting, dynamic, and contentious fields of inquiry into America's past. It is now safer to assume, as Comanche historian Paul Chaat Smith has pointed out, that everything you know about Indians is in fact wrong. Most people have much to "unlearn" about Native American history before true learning can take place. This course aims to achieve that end by (re)introducing students to key themes and trends in the history of North America's indigenous nations. Employing an issues-oriented approach, the course stresses the ongoing complexity of Native American societies' engagements with varieties of settler colonialism since 1492 and dedicates itself to a concerted program of myth-busting. As such, the course will provide numerous opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking and reading skills.
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HIST 2664 : What's Colonial About Early America?
Crosslisted as: AMST 2664 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Many Americans envision the colonial period as a relatively quaint and benign time dominated by Pocahontas, the Pilgrims, and provinciality.  Pairing the term "colonial" with "America" also tends to render the nearly-three centuries between Europeans' arrival in the western hemisphere and the Declaration of Independence as the prehistory of the United States when in fact multiple colonial regimes existed in North America at any time prior to 1776.  This course investigates the rich, complex, and violent history of early America with the objective of a fresh appreciation of its "colonial" aspects – natural resource extraction, territorial expropriation and displacement of indigenous peoples, exploitation of enslaved labor, and the imposition of juridical authority over "settled" spaces – with an eye toward a better understanding of the larger patterns of domination (however incomplete) in which the emergent international state system and global capitalism creating imbalances of wealth and power that persist to this day.  In addition to exploration of familiar sites like the thirteen Anglo-American colonies, the course will venture into less well-known areas (including those outside contemporary national American boundaries) to enhance students' appreciation of the diversity of human in experience in early America via comparative analysis.
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HIST 2674 : History of the Modern Middle East
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2674, GOVT 2747, NES 2674 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines major trends in the evolution of the Middle East in the modern era. Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries and ending with the  "Arab Spring," we will consider Middle East history with an emphasis on five themes: imperialism, nationalism, modernization, Islam, and revolution.  Readings will be supplemented with translated primary sources, which will form the backbone of class discussions.
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HIST 2689 : Roman History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2689, CLASS 7689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the prehistoric settlements on the site of Rome to the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century and its revival in the East with Byzantium. Lectures will provide a narrative and interpretations of major issues, including: empire building, cultural unity and diversity, religious transformations, changing relations between state and society. Discussion section will be the opportunity to engage with important texts, ancient and modern, about Rome.
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HIST 2690 : History of Terrorism
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This lecture course examines approaches to the study of European terrorism. It will cover 1) the history of terrorism as it developed over the course of the modern era (in the process distinguishing terrorism from other forms of modern political violence, e.g. partisan warfare, state terror, etc.) and 2) the ways terrorism has been perceived, presented, and remembered by contemporaries and subsequent generations. Questions, therefore, will include the following: How has terrorism been approached by political theory, history, literature, etc.? How have these approaches constructed terrorism as an object of scientific investigation? How were terrorists perceived and represented by their contemporaries (in the press, literature, the arts)? How did terrorists represent themselves (in political pamphlets, autobiographies, fiction)? Readings will include archival materials, manifestos, memoirs, and novels, as well as classic pieces of political writing (e.g. Lenin, Schmitt, Arendt).
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HIST 2710 : Introduction to the History of Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2071, STS 2071 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an introductory survey of the history of medicine (principally in Europe and the United States) from classical antiquity to the early twentieth century. Using a combination of both primary and secondary sources, students will learn about the "Hippocratic Heritage" of contemporary western medicine; medicine in late antiquity; faith and healing in the medieval period; medicine and knowledge in the Islamic world; medicine during the Renaissance (particularly the rise of the mechanical philosophy); medicine in the age of Enlightenment; professionalization, women-doctors and midwives, and battles over 'quackery' in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the role of medicine in colonialism and empire; and the promises and perils of modern medicine (dramatic decreases in mortality on the one hand, the rise of Eugenics and the importance of Medicine to the National Socialist State on the other). As well as this temporal survey, we will consider a number of ongoing themes: race, bodily difference, and medicine; medicine and the environment; women, gender, and medicine; the history of the body; the history of sexuality; and the close connections between forms of social order and forms of medical knowledge. The course meets three times a week (for two lectures and a section) and is open to all.
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HIST 2726 : Culture and Identity in Modern America: The 19th Century
Crosslisted as: AMST 2726 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The nineteenth century changed everything in the United States: it gave us what we think of as modern American culture.  The nation went from rural, agrarian, economically dependent, partially enslaved, and otherwise relatively homogeneous, to urban, industrial, economically powerful, emancipated, and relatively heterogeneous.  Americans embraced corporate capitalism and consumerism at the end of the century, and that, in particular, has had a lasting impact. This course examines all those changes, with an emphasis on the development of cultural and intellectual diversity in the United States. Key topics and themes include: literature; slavery, abolition, and racial issues; the women's movement; Darwinism and Social Darwinism; professionalization; individualism; landscape and environment; class and capitalism; responses to industrialization and modernization; expansion and the western frontier; and visual culture. We'll focus on both ideas and individuals, using mostly primary documents but contextualizing and cross-examining them as we go. Perhaps the overarching theme is the contestation of culture: we'll explore the ways in which individuals both shape and are shaped by their society—the ways in which they both reinforce and resist its pressures. Of course, there is no one definitive characteristic of our cultural heritage, but in this course we will make a concerted effort to consider what people mean when they say "America."  We'll try especially hard to see how certain 19th-century definitions of American culture have carried through to the 21st century.
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HIST 2740 : Introduction to Modern Central Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Graveyard of Empires. The Crossroads of the World. The Pivot of History. For all its grand nicknames, Central Asia remains a region little-studied in the West. This course endeavors to separate fact from fantasy while providing an introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of Central Asia from the eighteenth century to the present day Considering Russian/Soviet and Chinese Central Asia as well as Afghanistan, we will explore the impact of cross-cultural contacts and the advance of neighboring empires on the region's diverse societies in the modern era.
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HIST 2750 : History of Modern India
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2275 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course is a broad survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent from remnants of the Mughal empire through the end of the British empire into the postcolonial present. Prominent themes include the emergence of nonviolent protest, religious and regional identities, ethnic rivalries, social reform and the "woman question," deindustrialization, nationalism and the place of democracy and militarism in a region that includes two nuclear powers, India and Pakistan. 
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HIST 2791 : International Humanitarianism
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course studies international humanitarian and human rights activities from their origins to the present.  The ideological and social roots of humanitarian thought and action receive attention, as does the often-overlapping, sometimes conflictual relationship between humanitarianism and human rights advocacy.  Case studies will include the anti-slavery movement, the activities of faith-based groups, biographical studies of pioneering individuals, and the international response to the creation of refugees and to various genocides.
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HIST 2797 : Muslims on the Silk Road
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2297, RELST 2297 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Crossroads of the World. The Pivot of History. The heart of the Silk Road. For all its grand nicknames and associations, Inner Asia remains a region little-studied in the West. This course endeavors to separate fact from fantasy while introducing the social, cultural, and political history of Inner Asia in the medieval and early modern periods. We will explore the impact of cross-cultural contacts on the region's diverse societies as we witness the rise and fall of empires, both nomadic and sedentary. We will focus especially on the histories of Muslim communities, as Islam has been the predominant religious tradition in the region for the last millennium. Special emphasis will be given to reading texts produced by Inner Asian authors, as we endeavor to consider the region's history not only from the vantage point of foreign observers and conquerors, but also from within.
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HIST 2860 : The French Revolution
Crosslisted as: FREN 2860 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In the turbulent and violent years from 1789 to 1815, France experienced virtually every form of government known to the modern world. This course explores the rapidly changing political landscape of this extraordinary period as well as the evolution of Revolutionary culture (the arts, theater, songs, fashion, the cult of the guillotine, attitudes towards gender and race). Whenever possible, we will use texts and images produced by the Revolutionaries themselves.
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HIST 2910 : Modern European Jewish History, 1789 - 1948
Crosslisted as: JWST 2920, NES 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Jewish life in Europe experienced a profound transformation as a result of the process of Jewish emancipation which began at the end of the eighteenth century.  While emancipation offered Jews unprecedented social, economic and political opportunities, it also posed serious challenges to traditional Jewish life and values by making available new avenues of integration.  This course will examine the ways in which Jewish and non-Jewish society responded to these new developments from the eighteenth century Enlightenment to the post-World War II era.  Topics will include Jewish responses to emancipation, including assimilation and new varieties of religious accommodation; the development of modern antisemitism; the rise of Zionism and the creation of the state of Israel; the modernization of Eastern European Jewry; the impact of mass immigration; and the Nazi era.
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HIST 2920 : Inventing an Information Society
Crosslisted as: AMST 2980, ECE 2980, ENGRG 2980, INFO 2921, STS 2921 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Explores the history of information technology from the 1830s to the present by considering the technical and social history of telecommunications (telegraph and the telephone), radio, television, computers, and the Internet. Emphasis is on the changing relationship between science and technology, the economic aspects of innovation, gender and technology, and other social relations of this technology.
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HIST 2985 : Transformations in Twentieth Century China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2286, CAPS 2985 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The twentieth century was a time of unprecedented change in China as the country's ancient imperial system collapsed and a new modern order began to emerge. This course will explore the myriad transformations that occurred during this remarkable century of revolution and renewal. Among the major changes that we will focus on are the fall of the Qing dynasty, the intellectual awakening of May Fourth, the rise of the Nationalist party-state, and key events of the Communist era, such as the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution under Mao Zedong and the capitalist reforms of Deng Xiaoping. The class will encourage historical reflection on China's engagement with the modern world in order to better understand the complex reality of China today.
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HIST 3002 : Supervised Research - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised research with a history faculty member.  Student must complete an on-line Independent Study form with a faculty supervisor to determine requirements and for permission.  Students then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 3002 : Supervised Research - Undergraduate
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Independent Study based supervised research with a history faculty member.  Student must complete an on-line Independent Study form with a faculty supervisor to determine requirements and for permission.  Students then work with their faculty supervisor throughout the semester for sucessful completion and grading of the agreed upon requirements.
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HIST 3031 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: AMST 3032, ASRC 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries. 
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HIST 3140 : U.S. in the World
Crosslisted as: AMST 3140, CAPS 3140 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students examine the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century. The course focuses on the domestic sources of foreign policy and the assumptions of the major policy makers (Wilson through Bush), as well as U.S. relations with pivotal global actors. Important themes include the American response to a revolutionary world since 1912, American response to colonialism and anticolonialism, and role of different areas of government, from the president to the CIA, in the making of U.S. foreign policy.
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HIST 3181 : Living in an Uncertain World: Science, Technology, and Risk
Crosslisted as: AMST 3185, BSOC 3181, STS 3181 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the history, sociology, and ethics of risk. In particular, we will focus on the complex and often ambiguous relationship between science, technology, and risk. A historical perspective shows how science and technology have generated risks while they have also played key roles in managing and solving those very risks. By examining several case studies, including 19th-century mining, the 1911 Triangle fire, nuclear science, the space shuttle disasters, asbestos litigation, Hurricane Katrina, and the contemporary financial crisis, we will consider how risk and ideas about risk have changed over time. By exploring different historical and cultural responses to risk, we will examine the sociopolitical dimensions of the definitions, perceptions, and management of risk both in the past and the present.
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HIST 3312 : What was the Vietnam War?
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3312 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
If you have ever wondered what the Vietnam War was all about, how did it begin, how was it fought, why was it so controversial, why did the American people turn against it, why was it important, why were generations of American students taught the North Vietnamese version of the war, why the South Vietnamese allies of the United States were abandoned, and what happened to the Vietnamese and the Americans as a result of the war—then this class is for you! With fresh eyes and surprising insights, it will take you beyond the fashionable fictions and clichés to look at the twenty-five years during which the United States, through six presidential administrations, was involved in Vietnamese affairs (1950-1975). For decades, Americans have been meditating on "the lessons of the Vietnam War," but it turns out that neither was any lesson ever learned nor were the so-called "lessons" even plausibly related to actual events. Today, Americans continue to be taught myths about the Vietnam War. This course shows why these myths obstruct a realistic understanding of American history during the past half-century.
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HIST 3519 : History of State and Society in Modern Iran (Through Literature and Film)
Crosslisted as: NES 3519 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the conditions of strict censorship and numerous limitations on various forms of political organization and activism, literature and cinema, especially Iran's internationally acclaimed art cinematography, have been the major outlets through which the social and political concerns of the Iranian society have been voiced throughout the modern period. The course explores major themes and periods in Iran's transition from the secular state of the Pahlavi dynasty to the religious state of the Islamic Republic in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will focus on social as well as political themes including the Anglo-Russo-American Occupation of Iran, the 1979 Islamic Revolution, U.S.-Iranian relations, Iraq-Iran War, the Green Movement and the crisis of Islamic government, Images of the West in Iran, Modern Youth Culture, Gender segregation, and the struggle between modernity and traditionalism in contemporary Iran. We will watch selected Iranian documentary and feature films and draw on modern Persian literature but will approach them not as art forms but as reflections of major socio-economic, political, and religious phenomena in Iran's modern history. We will read and watch what the Iranians wrote and produced, read and watched, in order to view and explain Iran and its relations with the West through the Iranian eyes. We will examine how the Iranians perceived themselves and the others, how they viewed their own governments and the West, what issues inspired and shaped their outlook outside the official censorship during the period in question. All readings are in English translation and the films are with English subtitles. The course includes lectures deconstructing political, religious, and social evolution of modern Iran as well as regular class discussions where we will address the issues in question from a variety of perspectives.
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HIST 3580 : The Road to Nazi Germany: German History from 1870 to 1945
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the causes and consequences of the "catastrophic nationalism" of the German nation state from its unification by war in 1870 under Bismarck, through the First World War and Germany's defeat, to the unloved Weimar Republic and its legendary political violence, culminating in the Third Reich's unprecedented logic of total destruction and annihilation. What social and political forces caused the German state(s) to unleash two world wars and several genocides? What role did the military play? Why were opponents unable to stop these developments? And why did these forces, once unleashed, not shrink from the total destruction of the German nation itself? In addition to reading a novel, historical works, and original documents, we view classic films from the Weimar period and the Third Reich, which reflect the troubled politics of mass destruction. 
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HIST 3590 : The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: AMST 3590, ASRC 3590 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what Black Marxism author Cedric Robinson called "the Black Radical Tradition." It will introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action, and organizing, with an emphasis on the United States after World War I. It relies on social, political, and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but a fundamental restructuring of political, economic, and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting contexts of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality in social movements.
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HIST 3652 : African Economic Development Histories
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3652 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What impact did Africa's involvement in the slave trade and its colonization by Europe have on its long-term economic health? What role have post-independence political decisions made within Africa and by multinational economic actors (the World Bank and the IMF, for example) had on altering the trajectory of Africa's economic history? Does China's recent heavy investment in Africa portend a movement away from or a continuation of Africa's economic underdevelopment? These questions and others will be addressed in this course. 
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HIST 3677 : The Search for the Historical Muhammad
Crosslisted as: HIST 6677, MEDVL 3677, NES 3677, NES 6677, RELST 3677 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As the founder of Islam Muhammad is one of the most influential figures in world history. An important source for his life is the Sira of Ibn Ishaq (d. ca. 761), a biography that opens with Muhammad's birth ca. 570 and ends with his death in 632. If we take the narrative reports in this text at face-value, then Muhammad appears to have been born in the full light of history. But is the Sira a reliable source for the historical Muhammad? In this seminar, we will read this text in its entirely and analyze selected episodes from a critical historical perspective, with special attention to biblical and post-biblical models for the writing of sacred history.
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HIST 3710 : World War II in Europe
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Second World War remains the single most important set of events shaping the contemporary world. The course deals with both the events of World War II as they shaped European and world history and the way those events were remembered and commemorated in postwar years. Lectures, screenings, and readings will examine: the role of wartime political leaders and military commanders; the experience of war and occupation for soldiers and civilians, including Resistance movements and collaborators; Nazi genocide; intellectual and cultural changes during the war, including the impact on literature and philosophy; strategic questions about the origins and conduct of the war; the concluding phases involving the Nuremberg Trials, the Yalta and Potsdam conferences, and the launching of the Cold War; and the representation of the war in subsequent films, literature, and political culture.
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HIST 3837 : The Cold War
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3837 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
During more than four decades following the end of World War II international politics was dominated by a phenomenon known as the Cold War. This class examines the origins, course, and ultimate demise of this conflict that pitted the United States and NATO against the Soviet Union and its allies. It seeks to evaluate the competing explanations that political scientists and historians have put forward to explain the Cold War by drawing on the new evidence that has become available. The course considers political, economic, and strategic aspects of the Cold War, including the nuclear arms race, with particular focus on the link between domestic and foreign policy. The course emphasizes writing, and includes a final research paper for which students will use original archival materials. Please contact the instructor if you are interested in an optional extra-credit Russian-language section.
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HIST 3870 : The History of Consumption: From Wedgwood to Wal-Mart
Crosslisted as: AMST 3870, ILRLR 3870 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Whether buying at a general store, shopping at a department store, or loitering at a mall, consumption has always formed an important part of the American experience. More than just commodities bought and sold, consumption is also about the institutions, social practices, cultural meanings, and economic functions that have surrounded the merchandise. This course will look at the changing meanings consumption has had for life, politics, and economy in the US over the past 300 years.
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HIST 3950 : Monsoon Kingdoms: Pre-Modern Southeast Asian History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3397, ASIAN 6697, HIST 6950 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Southeast Asia's history from earliest times up until the mid-eighteenth century. The genesis of traditional kingdoms, the role of monumental architecture (such as Angkor in Cambodia and Borobodur in Indonesia), and the forging of maritime trade links across the region are all covered. Religion - both indigenous to Southeast Asia and the great imports of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam - are also surveyed in the various premodern polities that dotted Southeast Asia. This course questions the region's early connections with China, India, and Arabia, and asks what is indigenous about Southeast Asian history, and what has been borrowed over the centuries. Open to undergraduates, both majors and non-majors in History, and to graduate students, though with separate requirements.
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HIST 3960 : Transnational Local: Southeast Asian History from the Eighteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3396, ASIAN 6696, HIST 6960 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Surveys the modern history of Southeast Asia with special attention to colonialism, the Chinese diaspora, and socio-cultural institutions.  Considers global transformations that brought "the West" into people's lives in Southeast Asia.  Focuses on the development of the modern nation-state, but also questions the narrative by incorporating groups that are typically excluded.  Assigns primary texts in translation. 
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HIST 4000 : Introduction to Historical Research
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is an introduction to the theory, practice, and art of historical research and writing. One key purpose of this course is to prepare students to work on longer research projects—especially an Honors Thesis. We will analyze the relationship between evidence and argument in historical writing; assess the methods and possible biases in various examples of historical writing; identify debates and sources relevant to research problems; think about how to use sources creatively; and discuss the various methodological issues associated with historical inquiry, analysis, and presentation.
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HIST 4000 : Introduction to Historical Research
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar is an introduction to the theory, practice, and art of historical research and writing. One key purpose of this course is to prepare students to work on longer research projects—especially an Honors Thesis. We will analyze the relationship between evidence and argument in historical writing; assess the methods and possible biases in various examples of historical writing; identify debates and sources relevant to research problems; think about how to use sources creatively; and discuss the various methodological issues associated with historical inquiry, analysis, and presentation.
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HIST 4001 : Honors Guidance
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course provides structure for the student's research and introduces them to research techniques. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the History Department's Honors Program.
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HIST 4002 : Honors Research
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to facilitate student's successful completion of their History Department Honors theses through regular deadlines and small group writing workshops.
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HIST 4122 : Darwin and the Making of Histories
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4122, STS 4122 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The power of a name is sometimes as great as that of an idea.  This course will study how Darwin became, then and now, an icon rather than just a Victorian naturalist.  We will look at writings of Darwin himself, especially On the Origin of Species (1859), Descent of Man (1871), and his short autobiography, and attempt to understand what they meant in their own time, how Darwin came to write them, and how his contemporaries helped to shape their future.  How did Victorian ideologies of gender, race, and class shape the production and reception of Darwin's work?  We will also examine the growth of "Darwinism" as a set of broader social and cultural movements, particularly in Britain and the United States.  Were eugenics movements examples or perversions of Darwinism?  Finally, we will consider how Darwin's name has been used by more recent evolutionary biologists and by American anti-evolutionists. 
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HIST 4127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 4127, HIST 6127 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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HIST 4160 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4416, FGSS 4160, LGBT 4160 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students consider the relationships among colonialism and gender and sexual identity formation in Southeast Asia. Using material from a wide range of fields including anthropology and literature, the course complicates the simplistic East/West and male/female binary. Each year the course is offered, its emphasis shifts to adapt to changes in the fields of gender, sexuality and Asian Studies. It incorporates theoretical literature and content that is broader than that of Southeast Asia. 
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HIST 4235 : Images and History:Siegfried Kracauer
Crosslisted as: GERST 4355, GERST 6355, HIST 6235, JWST 4350, ROMS 4350, ROMS 6350 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As an outstanding figure of critical theory in the twentieth century, Siegfried Kracauer left an astonishingly rich body of work spanning literature and the sociology of mass culture, film criticism and the philosophy of history.  The common thread that runs through his prismatic works is the conception of image as a key for interpreting life, society and history.  This seminar will reconstitute and analyze his intellectual trajectory from the Weimar Republic to his exile in New York, reading several fundamental texts, from his early essays on photography and dance to his more known theoretical works (From Caligari to Hitler, Theory of Film, and History: The Last Things Before the Last.)  It also will inscribe Kracauer into a historical context and an intellectual constellation shaped by his correspondence and friendship with other illustrious Jewish-German exiles, from Theodor W. Adorno to Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch to Erwin Panofsky.
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HIST 4237 : The Holocaust/History Writing
Crosslisted as: FREN 4375, FREN 6375, GERST 4375, GERST 6375, HIST 6237, ROMS 4370, ROMS 6370 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the last decades, "Holocaust Studies" witnessed an extraordinary expansion, covering different fields of scholarship, from history to literature, from philosophy to aesthetics.  This seminar will retrace the major steps of Holocaust history writing.  It will analyze the classical debates between "intentionalism" and "functionalism," the discrepancies between the analytical approaches focused on the perpetrators and those focused on the victims, the inscription of the Holocaust into the broader context of war violence, and its comparison with the genocidal violence of colonialism.  Finally, it will investigate some methodological problems concerning the place of testimony in history writing and the permanent connections, both fruitful and problematic, between history and memory.  This means taking into account the entanglement of the most productive areas of Holocaust scholarship (Germany, France and the United States) as well as the relationship between the historiography of the Holocaust and other disciplines (memory studies, postcolonial studies, etc.).
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HIST 4255 : Climate History: New Perspectives on Science, Society, and Environment
Crosslisted as: STS 4251 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Climate change is old news. Human societies have been debating and coping with climatic changes since long before the (relatively) recent advent of massive-scale greenhouse gas emissions. In this seminar, we will immerse ourselves in scholarly debates about the role of climate change in causing social, economic, cultural, and political changes. For instance, did the Little Ice Age spark sixteenth-century witch-hunts in Europe? We will also delve into case studies focusing on historical climate beliefs and their significance. How did climate theory legitimize French colonialism in the Maghreb? Throughout the course, we will discuss how climate history can inform contemporary climate change discourse and activism.
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HIST 4345 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, CLASS 7679, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor. 
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HIST 4385 : Building, Inhabiting, Destroying Urban Latin America
Crosslisted as: HIST 6385, LATA 4385, LATA 6385 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Today, Latin America is the most urbanized region in the world, with about 80% of Latin Americans living in urban centers. Only a century ago, however, Latin America was predominantly rural, with 80% of the population residing in the region's vast and varied rural areas. How did this dramatic change happen? What had to be built or destroyed, materially and ideologically, to make the continuous growth of cities possible? What were the political and social strategies of recent urban inhabitants and working people to accommodate to and transform the ostensibly frenetic, and often turbulent, process of urban growth? This course will address these questions from a historical perspective, by drawing on historical monographs, anthropological studies, architectural histories, planning proposals, political texts, development reports, and films. We will focus on the social, economic, and political practices that transformed the Latin American urban world, from the "Europeanized" cities of the turn of the century to today's megalopolises, as well as on the ideological and theoretical frameworks set up to grasp and, thus, reshape the persistent process of urbanization over the course of the century.
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HIST 4390 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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HIST 4405 : Magic and Demonic Creatures between Reformation and Enlightenment
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines beliefs in magic and magical creatures, looking at how the occult organized all aspects of early modern life.  Scientists believed that magic could help them create gold, doctors practiced blood magic, and court magistrates sentenced Jews or elderly women to death for allegedly performing devilish rituals on small children. Through the course readings, both primary and secondary, we will analyze how the superstitious was mobilized within struggles between Catholics and Protestants, the nobility and the peasantry, and within emergent Enlightenment philosophy.  In particular we will discuss why witches or werewolves were imagined (and hunted) in the period, what that can tell us about the cultural climate of the time, but also how their meaning could morph into the familiar horror stapes of our own world.
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HIST 4460 : Strategy in World War II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Strategic decision-making in World War II. The course will be organized into a "task force" addressing crucial problems faced by the European-American Allies in World War II: the invasion of northwest Europe, strategic bombing tactics, the rescue of European Jews, and coordination with the Soviet Union. Individual papers and presentations to the group and to panels at Cornell and in Washington, D.C. 
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HIST 4520 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4620, ANTHR 7620, HIST 6520, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 4520, NES 7520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Jerusalem to Rome, from Shanghai to Marrakesh, Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. This course ranges through time and space to examine how Jewish and other "minority" experiences offer a window onto questions of modernity and post-colonialism in intersections of the built environment with migration, urban space, and memory. Readings and film/video encompass historical, ethnographic, visual, architectural and literary materials to offer a broad look at materials on ghettos, empires, cosmopolitanism, tolerance, immigrant enclaves, race and ethnicity.
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HIST 4547 : The Middle East in Africa, Africa in the Middle East
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4547, ASRC 6547, HIST 6547, NES 4547, NES 6547 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar we will explore the Ottoman Empire's presence in the continent, and the continent's influence on the rest of the Ottoman Empire.  In addition to the focus on the history of Ottoman North Africa, we will explore the role Istanbul played in the history of the Red Sea Basin (today's Somalia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia) and vice versa. A special focus will be placed on the role sub-Saharan African slave trade played in Ottoman society, from the ruling elite households of Istanbul to the day-to-day formulation of ideas of difference making across the Turkish and Arabic speaking parts of the Ottoman Empire. Emphasis will be placed on reading new literature on race and slavery in the Ottoman world, borrowing theoretical and analytical formulations around this topic form better-developed historiographies of other parts of the world. This seminar targets a senior and graduate students interested in the history of empire, the Middle East and Africa trans-imperial histories, and south-south relations. 
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HIST 4723 : Scandal, Corruption, and the Making of the British Empire in India
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4465, SHUM 4623 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
As the English East India Company conquered vast Indian territories in the late 1700s, it was besieged with allegations of corruption against its leading officials. This course will examine the origins of modern imperialism through the lens of corruption, exploring how corruption scandals became sites for generating new ideas and practices of empire. As well as reading prominent figures of the European enlightenment, including Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, and Denis Diderot, we will also study major Indian writers on corruption, including the historian Ghulam Husain, and the liberal reformer, Ram Mohan Roy. Students will conduct primary research into eighteenth-century imperial corruption scandals, and consider the larger question of how modern ideas of political reform grew out of early modern theories of corruption.
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HIST 4724 : The Politics of Imprisonment
Crosslisted as: SHUM 4624 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Different polities incarcerate in different ways. This seminar puts prisons into their wider political contexts, considering them as sites for wider debates about rights, tyranny, corruption and slavery, race and empire. Why did the birth of the modern prison coincide so closely with the birth of the American (and French) republics? How did changing forms of imprisonment intersect with imperial ambitions? What do the new generation of activists and scholars mean by "the carceral state?" Why and when do politicians talk about prisons, how do prisons serve as models or anti-models for political society? In what sense can we call prisons political institutions, or speak of a "carceral state?" Readings cover Europe and the US from the 17th century to the present.
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HIST 4751 : Science, Race, and Colonialism
Crosslisted as: STS 4751 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is divided into three major thematic sections. The first looks at the history of racial thinking in the West. We begin with the existence (or not) of conceptions of biological race in the early- modern period, focusing on early voyages of discovery and so-called "first encounters" between the peoples of the Old and New Worlds.  In the second part of the course we will look at early enunciations of racial thought in the late 18th century and at the problems of classification that these raised, before examining the roots of "Scientific Racism." We close with a look at Darwin, Social Darwinism, and eugenics movements in different national contexts.  The last third of the course looks at science and technology in colonial contexts, including "colonial technologies" (guns, steam- ships, and telegraphs) as well as medicine and public hygiene.
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HIST 4900 : New World Encounters, 1500 - 1800
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4900, AMST 4900, HIST 6900 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The discovery of the Americas, wrote Francisco Lopez de Gomara in 1552, was "the greatest event since the creation of the world, excepting the Incarnation and Death of Him who created." Five centuries have not diminished either the overwhelming importance or the strangeness of the early encounter between Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Taking a comparative approach, this course will conceptualize early American history as the product of reciprocal cultural encounters by assessing the various experiences of Spanish, French, and English newcomers in different regions of the Americas. Critical interpretation of primary source material will be emphasized in the course, as will the development of students' ability to reflect critically on these documents, taking into account the perspective of both the colonizers and the colonized. 
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HIST 4922 : Ocean: The Sea in Human History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4492, HIST 6922 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the role of the oceans in human history, from earliest times to the present.  It does so by moving both chronologically and topically through oceanic history, so that a number of important topics are covered.  We start by looking at a number of different methodologies that may be useful in examining the sea, and then proceed to week-long reading sections on the sea in the ancient world, the Age of Discovery (European and non-European), and at the science of the sea.  The second half of the course gets more geographic in focus: week-long sessions deliberate on individual oceans and the main themes that have driven them, covering the Atlantic, the Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the polar seas.  Slavery, piracy, discovery, cultural transmission, nautics and science are a part of all of these stories, though in different ways.  The course hopes to impart to students the overwhelmingly important role of the oceans in forging human history, both in the centuries that have past and in our modern world.  Open to all students with an interest in the sea.
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HIST 6000 : Graduate Research Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar is devoted entirely to the writing of a substantive research paper. Students will share research proposals, annotated bibliographies, outlines and portions of rough drafts. Class meetings will be devoted to discussing what students have produced, and general issues associated with constructing research papers.
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HIST 6006 : History Colloquium Series
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
HIST 6006 : History Colloquium Series
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 6011 : The African American Intellectual Tradition
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6011 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
We will consider a selection of recent scholarship on some of the main issues of African American and Africana Studies.  The African American Intellectual tradition is so vast, that our readings will necessarily be selective.  We will focus on scholarship on the assumption that students have read canonical texts (e.g. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk; Cooper, A Voice From the South). The list of assigned texts includes classic works as well as recent scholarship.  Our focus will be on African American intellectual and social thought, as well as scholarship reflecting the struggles and concerns of African Americans and African descended people.  Organized around themes (music, radicalism, religion, cultural studies, etc.) rather than specific thinkers, our readings reflect the field's development beyond earlier  preoccupations with race and racism, to address the intersections of "race" with gender, class, and sexuality.
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HIST 6065 : Science, Technology and Capitalism
Crosslisted as: STS 6061 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the relationship between scientific development, technological innovation and maintenance, and the capitalistic forces that support and benefit from these activities.
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HIST 6127 : The Body Politic in Asia
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4415, ASIAN 6615, CAPS 4127, FGSS 4127, HIST 4127 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution.  This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia.  The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea.  Interaction with the West is a major theme.  Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics.  The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures.  The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.
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HIST 6202 : Political Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 6202, ANTHR 6102, GOVT 6202, SOC 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.
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HIST 6221 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: STS 6121 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This graduate seminar offers an introduction to environmental history—the study of human interactions with nonhuman nature in the past. It is a subfield within the historical discipline that has complex roots, an interdisciplinary orientation, and synergies with fields across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. This seminar explores environmental history on three levels: historically, historiographically, and theoretically. What are some of the key historical processes that have shaped humans' historical relationships with the environment at various scales? How have environmental historians (re)conceptualized the field as it has developed over the past half-century? What analytic concepts have environmental historians used to understand human-natural relations? Select themes include ecological imperialism, labor and work, body/environment, global environmental history, "mainstreaming" environmental history, and the Anthropocene.
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HIST 6235 : Images and History: Siegfried Kracauer
Crosslisted as: GERST 4355, GERST 6355, HIST 4235, JWST 4350, ROMS 4350, ROMS 6350 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As an outstanding figure of critical theory in the twentieth century, Siegfried Kracauer left an astonishingly rich body of work spanning literature and the sociology of mass culture, film criticism and the philosophy of history.  The common thread that runs through his prismatic works is the conception of image as a key for interpreting life, society and history.  This seminar will reconstitute and analyze his intellectual trajectory from the Weimar Republic to his exile in New York, reading several fundamental texts, from his early essays on photography and dance to his more known theoretical works (From Caligari to Hitler, Theory of Film, and History: The Last Things Before the Last.)  It also will inscribe Kracauer into a historical context and an intellectual constellation shaped by his correspondence and friendship with other illustrious Jewish-German exiles, from Theodor W. Adorno to Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch to Erwin Panofsky.
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HIST 6237 : The Holocaust/History Writing
Crosslisted as: FREN 4375, FREN 6375, GERST 4375, GERST 6375, HIST 4237, ROMS 4370, ROMS 6370 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the last decades, "Holocaust Studies" witnessed an extraordinary expansion, covering different fields of scholarship, from history to literature, from philosophy to aesthetics.  This seminar will retrace the major steps of Holocaust history writing.  It will analyze the classical debates between "intentionalism" and "functionalism," the discrepancies between the analytical approaches focused on the perpetrators and those focused on the victims, the inscription of the Holocaust into the broader context of war violence, and its comparison with the genocidal violence of colonialism.  Finally, it will investigate some methodological problems concerning the place of testimony in history writing and the permanent connections, both fruitful and problematic, between history and memory.  This means taking into account the entanglement of the most productive areas of Holocaust scholarship (Germany, France and the United States) as well as the relationship between the historiography of the Holocaust and other disciplines (memory studies, postcolonial studies, etc.).
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HIST 6276 : Radicalism
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This Seminar will examine the history of the European Left from 1848 until 1917. Readings will concentrate on key theoretical works by Marx, Blanqui, Bakunin, Kropotkin, Malatersa, Shaw, Kausky, Luxemburg, Trotsky, Sorel, and Lenin.
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HIST 6322 : Readings in 20th Century African-American History
Crosslisted as: AMST 6322, ASRC 6322 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This graduate seminar will explore major currents in historical writing about African-American life and culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on social, intellectual, and labor history, we will identify key themes in recent studies of the formation of modern black communities and politics before and after World War Two. The course will place special emphasis on class, gender, social movements, and migration.
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HIST 6345 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, CLASS 7679, HIST 4345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
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HIST 6385 : Building, Inhabiting, Destroying Urban Latin America
Crosslisted as: HIST 4385, LATA 4385, LATA 6385 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Today, Latin America is the most urbanized region in the world, with about 80% of Latin Americans living in urban centers. Only a century ago, however, Latin America was predominantly rural, with 80% of the population residing in the region's vast and varied rural areas. How did this dramatic change happen? What had to be built or destroyed, materially and ideologically, to make the continuous growth of cities possible? What were the political and social strategies of recent urban inhabitants and working people to accommodate to and transform the ostensibly frenetic, and often turbulent, process of urban growth? This course will address these questions from a historical perspective, by drawing on historical monographs, anthropological studies, architectural histories, planning proposals, political texts, development reports, and films. We will focus on the social, economic, and political practices that transformed the Latin American urban world, from the "Europeanized" cities of the turn of the century to today's megalopolises, as well as on the ideological and theoretical frameworks set up to grasp and, thus, reshape the persistent process of urbanization over the course of the century.
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HIST 6391 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4039, ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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HIST 6481 : Topics in Latin American History
Crosslisted as: LATA 6481 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar is a readings and research course that examines works in the broad field of Latin American studies (history, literature, anthropology, and others) from the past five decades that have wrestled theoretically, empirically, and narratively with the boundary between geography and history. While the focus is primarily on Latin America, the course also seeks to link on occasion to comparative perspectives from the U.S. and Canada and/or to 'think' hemispherically. Topics vary by semester and may include questions of scale, region, the state, the commons and property, nature, and geo-piracy. Graduate students from all disciplines and regional specializations welcome. 
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HIST 6491 : Readings in the History of Medicine
Crosslisted as: STS 6481 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This graduate course offers an introduction to the history of western medicine from the classical age to the 20th century. Students will be introduced to major events, figures, and themes, as well as to significant historiographical debates.
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HIST 6520 : Jewish Cities
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4620, ANTHR 7620, HIST 4520, JWST 4520, JWST 7520, NES 4520, NES 7520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Jerusalem to Rome, from Shanghai to Marrakesh, Jews and cities have been shaping each other for thousands of years. This course ranges through time and space to examine how Jewish and other "minority" experiences offer a window onto questions of modernity and post-colonialism in intersections of the built environment with migration, urban space, and memory. Readings and film/video encompass historical, ethnographic, visual, architectural and literary materials to offer a broad look at materials on ghettos, empires, cosmopolitanism, tolerance, immigrant enclaves, race and ethnicity.  
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HIST 6547 : The Middle East in Africa, Africa in the Middle East
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4547, ASRC 6547, HIST 4547, NES 4547, NES 6547 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this seminar we will explore the Ottoman Empire's presence in the continent, and the continent's influence on the rest of the Ottoman Empire.  In addition to the focus on the history of Ottoman North Africa, we will explore the role Istanbul played in the history of the Red Sea Basin (today's Somalia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia) and vice versa. A special focus will be placed on the role sub-Saharan African slave trade played in Ottoman society, from the ruling elite households of Istanbul to the day-to-day formulation of ideas of difference making across the Turkish and Arabic speaking parts of the Ottoman Empire. Emphasis will be placed on reading new literature on race and slavery in the Ottoman world, borrowing theoretical and analytical formulations around this topic form better-developed historiographies of other parts of the world. This seminar targets a senior and graduate students interested in the history of empire, the Middle East and Africa trans-imperial histories, and south-south relations. 
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HIST 6586 : U.S. Empire in Global and Transnational Dimensions
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will give you a broad introduction to the scholarship on U.S. imperialism, focusing on transnational and global approaches to history.  Examining the evolution of the field over the past three decades, we will focus on the interrelated shifts of a cultural turn that has illuminated issues of race, gender, and imperialism, and the globalization of the study of the United States.  In addition to considering the transnational circulation of culture and political projects (state and non-state), we will consider global approaches to the reconfigurations of capital, comparative and transnational studies of consumption, gender, and the family, and the transformation of international sovereignty inaugurated by the "Wilsonian moment" and Bolshevik revolution (with attention to tensions between sovereignty and transnational institutions and politics movements.)
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HIST 6677 : The Search for the Historical Muhammad
Crosslisted as: HIST 3677, MEDVL 3677, NES 3677, NES 6677, RELST 3677 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As the founder of Islam Muhammad is one of the most influential figures in world history. An important source for his life is the Sira of Ibn Ishaq (d. ca. 761), a biography that opens with Muhammad's birth ca. 570 and ends with his death in 632. If we take the narrative reports in this text at face-value, then Muhammad appears to have been born in the full light of history. But is the Sira a reliable source for the historical Muhammad? In this seminar, we will read this text in its entirely and analyze selected episodes from a critical historical perspective, with special attention to biblical and post-biblical models for the writing of sacred history.
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HIST 6900 : New World Encounters, 1500-1800
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4900, AMST 4900, HIST 4900 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The discovery of the Americas, wrote Francisco Lopez de Gomara in 1552, was "the greatest event since the creation of the world, excepting the Incarnation and Death of Him who created."  Five centuries have not diminished either the overwhelming importance or the strangeness of the early encounter between Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the Americas.  Taking a comparative approach, this course will conceptualize early American history as the product of reciprocal cultural encounters by assessing the various experiences of Spanish, French, and English newcomers in different regions of the Americas.  Critical interpretation of primary source material will be emphasized in the course, as will the development of students' ability to reflect critically on these documents, taking into account the perspective of both the colonizers and the colonized.
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HIST 6922 : Ocean: The Sea in Human History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 4492, HIST 4922 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
HIST 6950 : Monsoon Kingdoms: Pre-Modern Southeast Asian History
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3397, ASIAN 6697, HIST 3950 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Southeast Asia's history from earliest times up until the mid-eighteenth century. The genesis of traditional kingdoms, the role of monumental architecture (such as Angkor in Cambodia and Borobodur in Indonesia), and the forging of maritime trade links across the region are all covered. Religion - both indigenous to Southeast Asia and the great imports of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam - are also surveyed in the various premodern polities that dotted Southeast Asia. This course questions the region's early connections with China, India, and Arabia, and asks what is indigenous about Southeast Asian history, and what has been borrowed over the centuries. Open to undergraduates, both majors and non-majors in History, and to graduate students, though with separate requirements.
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HIST 6960 : Transnational Local: Southeast Asian History from the Eighteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3396, ASIAN 6696, HIST 3960 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Surveys the modern history of Southeast Asia with special attentions to colonialism, the Chinese diaspora, and socio-cultural institutions. Considers global transformations that brought "the West" into people's lives in Southeast Asia. Focuses on the development of the modern nation-state, but also questions the narrative by incorporating groups that are typically excluded. Assigns primary texts in translation.
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HIST 7090 : Introduction to the Graduate Study of History
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed to introduce entering graduate students to crucial issues and problems in historical methodology that cut across various areas of specialization.
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HIST 7220 : Exploring China's Archives
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 7722, MEDVL 7220 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will explore the historical processes by which Chinese documents have been compiled, curated, and re-curated. We will examine the theoretical and methodological implications of those curatorial processes for historical research and analysis. Focus will be on documents and archives of the middle to late imperial and modern periods.
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HIST 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 7937, STS 7937 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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HIST 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 7937, STS 7937 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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HIST 8010 : Independent Study-PIRIP
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description